Utilizing vaccines to reduce antimicrobial use

Utilizing vaccines to reduce antimicrobial use

By controlling certain viral diseases with vaccination, producers can reduce on-farm antimicrobial usage.

Nesting in enriched cages

Nesting in enriched cages

While multiple studies have uncovered some of what affects nesting and pre-nesting behaviour, much remains to be learned.

Maximizing broiler performance

Maximizing broiler performance

Reaching genetic potential through best management practices.

DATE: January 16LOCATION: United Counties of Prescott and RussellDETAILS: OMAFRA is reporting that a chicken from a mixed flock of 100 birds has tested positive for Infectious Laryngotracheitis (ILT). Poultry producers, small flock growers and service providers are urged to maintain enhanced biosecurity in the United Counties of Prescott Russell north of Hwy 417.SOURCE: www.fbcc.ca
DATE: January 8, 2019LOCATION: Riverside Country, Calif.DETAILS: The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) confirmed virulent Newcastle disease in a second commercial poultry flock in California. The latest case is in a commercial layer flock in Riverside County. This finding is part of an outbreak in southern California that began in May 2018 in backyard exhibition birds.SOURCE: www.aphis.usda.gov
Ontario's Minister of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, Ernie Hardeman, recently launched a public awareness campaign to highlight mental health challenges suffered by farmers and encourage people to ask for help when daily struggles become too much to bear."We care about the well-being of our farmers and farm families. We recognize they face unique mental health challenges associated with running a farm business, and want them to know it's OK to reach out for help," said Hardeman.As part of the campaign, Hardeman held a roundtable with members of the agricultural community and had a candid discussion on mental health issues in the sector."Farming can be a tough business, one that sometimes takes a toll on farmers and their families and yet we all know people who have been reluctant to ask for help," said Hardeman. "We want to address the stigma that still surrounds mental health, and help people find the resources that can make a difference."The ministry also supports a number of programs to help farmers, including research to evaluate mental health needs for farmers and farm business risk management programs to cover loss and damage.This is part of the government's commitment to invest $3.8 billion over the next 10 years to develop and implement a comprehensive and connected mental health and addictions strategy. "I want to thank the farmers and farm leaders who participated in our mental health roundtable and showed a great deal of openness and commitment to help tackle this issue and support hopefulness," Hardeman said.
DATE: December 21LOCATION: CanadaDETAILS: As of December 21st, 22 confirmed cases of Salmonella have appeared in Canada. This prompted the Public Health Agency of Canada to collaborate with provincial public health partners, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and Health Canada to investigate the outbreak. The investigation found exposure to raw chicken and turkey products to be the likely source of the outbreak. That's because many individuals who got sick noted eating different types of chicken and turkey before their illness occurred. Almost half of the illnesses, which are genetically related to illnesses that date back to 2017, happened between October and November of 2018.SOURCE: Canada.ca
After a year of uncertainty, Canada, the U.S. and Mexico finally agreed on ‘NAFTA 2.0’. Renamed the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), all three countries are expected to ratify the deal fairly soon.
In late 2017, the Poultry Industry Council reported that, “increased numbers of reovirus-associated lameness cases were reported in Ontario broiler flocks by poultry veterinarians between August and October.” It was necessary for some infected birds to be euthanized.
DATE: December 16, 2018LOCATION: Saint- Felix-de-Valois in Lanaudiere Region of QuebecDETAILS: There have been no additional cases of Infectious Laryngotracheitis (ILT) reported from the Quebec outbreak. An aggressive vaccination program continues. The first confirmed case in this outbreak occurred on June 14, 2018.SOURCE: www.fbcc.ca
DATE: December 14, 2018LOCATION: Leeds Grenville, OntarioDETAILS: A small flock of seven layer type birds has tested positive for Infectious Laryngotracheitis (ILT). Clinical signs first appeared in late November. The virus has been identified as a wild strain. Poultry producers, small flock growers and service providers are being urged to maintain enhanced biosecurity.SOURCE: www.fbcc.ca
DATE: December 5, 2018LOCATION: Perth County, OntarioDETAILS: Further laboratory tests have confirmed the diagnosis of Infectious Laryngotracheitis (ILT) in a Perth county egg layer flock. Birds were previously vaccinated as pullets. Mortality levels are decreasing, and the remainder of the flock appears healthy. Strict biocontainment measures are in place at the farm. Poultry producers and small flock growers are being urged to maintain enhanced biosecurity, particularly in unvaccinated flocks in the 10 km radius biosecurity risk area.SOURCE: www.fbcc.ca
DATE: November 9-15, 2018LOCATION: Los Angeles and Riverside counties, Calif.DETAILS: During the week of November 9-15, the USDA confirmed two additional cases of vND in backyard exhibition chickens in Los Angeles and Riverside counties, California. Since May 18, the USDA has confirmed 178 cases of vND in California: 104 in San Bernardino County, 35 in Riverside County, 38 in Los Angeles County and 1 in Ventura County.SOURCE: content.govdelivery.com
4-H Canada announced a new program Tuesday that will support the emotional and physical well being of rural youth across Canada.Called the 4-H Canada Healthy Living Initiative, the two-year program begins in spring 2019.The collaborate effort is supported by founding partner Farm Credit Canada (FCC), UFA Co-operative Limited, DowDuPont and Cargill, who’ve collectively pledged $150,000 toward the initiative.“This is an investment in young people who will play a large role in shaping the future of Canadian agriculture,” says Michael Hoffort, FCC president and CEO.The first year of the program will see the creation of resources and tools that will support youth facing mental health challenges.It will communicate how to access resources or recognize when a peer needs support as well.The second year will focus on physical health, nutrition and well-being.The approach is intended to help youth both navigate challenges and develop their strengths while focusing on wellness.The healthy living initiative is in response to the critical needs of youth in rural communities in Canada.Young people living in rural and remote communities are at greater risk of experiencing struggles related to their mental and physical well-being.They also lack the resources and services that might be available to those in more urban areas.The goal of this initiative is to support the 25,000 4-H youth members across Canada to lead lives that balance emotional, mental and physical health and remove barriers to access.As part of the two-year commitment, 4-H Canada will also deliver webinars and workshops and assist in the creation of resources that will be made available for the over 7,700 4-H volunteer leaders that are critical mentors and role models in adult-youth partnerships.These resources will train volunteers and offer resources that help recognize youth in distress and provide the access to support they need.“The Healthy Living Initiative means offering youth not only the tools and resources to face challenges, but also opportunities to learn how to thrive,” says Shannon Benner, 4-H Canada CEO.
Alternative housing systems have gained in popularity over the past few years due to an increase in outside influences. Consumers have become more involved with farm-to-fork and have driven the egg industry to adopt modifications on how birds are housed throughout their production cycle. 
The latest advances with an innovative new system for maximizing livestock feeding results have been unveiled by Canadian Bio-Systems Inc. (CBS Inc.) at the International Production & Processing Expo IPPE), Feb. 12-14, 2019 in Atlanta.“What’s your FSP fingerprint?” is a new approach to advanced precision livestock feeding that helps individual operations identify how they can best integrate and capture synergies among different types of feed science technology platforms.An early beta version of this robust science- and data-driven system was introduced last year coinciding with the launch of new CBS Inc. Feed Science Platforms (FSP). The full official launch of What’s your FSP fingerprint? at IPPE 2019 features the inclusion of further enhanced diagnostic technology and the introduction of a simple-to-use web-based application. (IPPE attendees can view the app and learn more by visiting CBS Inc. at Hall A, Booth A956.)“IPPE provides a window on many of the big picture trends and demands that are rapidly shaping the future of livestock production,” says Rob Patterson, CBS Inc. Technical Director. “These factors have major implications for the profitability and sustainability of all types of operations and for the sector as a whole. At the same time, advances in feed technology are opening new doors to help operations not only transition but thrive in this new environment.New opportunities in precision feeding“What’s your FSP fingerprint? allows everyone from nutritionists and producers to others involved in the feed industry and animal agriculture to quickly and simply identify the best package for success,” he says. “It takes the potential for precision feeding to a whole new level.”Every operation is unique and has its own requirements in order to truly maximize results in alignment with the latest expectations and opportunities, says Mark Peters, CBS Inc. Sales and Marketing Director. “Today the ability of an operation to keep up with the full spectrum of science-based feed technology innovation is a critical factor, not only in efficiency and overall production competitiveness but also in meeting specific, increasingly specialized market opportunities.“What’s your FSP fingerprint? provides a highly effective one-stop solution that fits today’s needs. It gives every operator peace of mind that they are utilizing the best package possible, customized to their specific requirements and objectives.”Capturing synergies across platformsThe FSPs include five areas of feed technology innovation: Multi-Carbohydrase technology, enhanced yeast technology, grain management technology, functional fatty acids, and phytogenics and probiotics. Together they represent a comprehensive portfolio of advanced bio-based feed technology solutions to benefit poultry, swine, aquaculture and ruminant production.What’s your FSP fingerprint? identifies the best customized package for each operation, leveraging a wealth of ongoing data collection along with more than 30 years of CBS Inc. research and development knowledge in partnership with leading university and institutional research programs.Dynamic science-driven potentialEach FSP area offers unique approaches to feed enhancement. Multi-Carbohydrase technology is a leading-edge area of enzyme technology pioneered by CBS Inc. that involves utilizing multiple enzymes with multiple activities to achieve a high level of targeted feed breakdown and nutrition capture.Enhanced yeast technology features natural growth promoter activity supporting healthy animals and optimized productivity. Functional fatty acids are gaining rising attention today, in particular for their potential to replace conventional options and support systems moving toward reduced use of antimicrobials.Grain management technology focuses on safeguarding feed quality to provide a valuable quality assurance tool and insurance policy for both feed and animals. Phytogenics and probiotics represent innovative plant-based extract technology that helps support a positive and nurturing environment critical to get the most efficiency and benefits from feed and nutrition approaches.
In the past decade, robotic solutions have found a home in the agricultural sector. Their uptake shouldn’t surprise anyone; robots are perfect for those repetitive and time-consuming tasks producers would prefer to leave behind.
The study of poultry production has progressed significantly over the past several years, including the introduction of more complex research approaches to understand changes in the bird.
The poultry industry has seen quick changes in regards to the usage of antibiotics. These have resulted in rapid responses by production teams to manage their processes differently. For instance, it would have been taboo five years ago to “wet” an egg in any way for fear of bacterial growth.
The goal of any broiler breeder program is to produce the greatest number of hatching eggs per hen housed and life of flock hatch to give us the most chicks per hen housed.
Transitioning from a conventional cage to alternative housing, either cage-free or within an aviary system, requires careful attention to good management. One important aspect of that is nutrition.
As you bundle up for winter, your livestock aren’t the only ones who want to stay out of the cold. Pests also seek shelter indoors when the temperatures drop. So, make the necessary preparations around your property to keep both the cold air and pests outside where they belong.
With the elimination of antibiotics occurring across Canadian poultry production, factors such as water quality are becoming much more important in the quest to optimize bird health.
There are three design elements of the Weeden sprinkler system.
Though barn fires are a year-round concern, most barn fires occur in the winter. The colder months are generally the time when feed and bedding storage is greatest, electricity use is high, and equipment repairs and upgrades are made. It is an important time to be extra vigilant. When it comes to barn fires, prevention is key.The Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA), in collaboration with representatives from fire protection and response, insurance, university, farm and commodity organizations, recommends these top 10 safety practices to reduce the risk of fire. These practices can be done without having to make major changes to building structures or equipment.1. Focus on HousekeepingMaintaining a clean and organized barn is a simple and cost-effective way to reduce the likelihood of barn fires.2. Limit The Use of Temporary Electrical EquipmentExtended use of temporary equipment can increase the chance of a fire occurring through degraded outlets and extension cords. Make sure to hard-wire electrical equipment that is used regularly.3. Regularly Inspect and Maintain Permanent Electrical SystemsThe humidity and corrosive gases generated by livestock and the storage of manure can degrade permanent electrical systems. The Electrical Safety Code has specific requirements for the installation of electrical equipment within livestock housing areas. For more information, see Section 22-204 and Bulletin 22-3-5 in the Ontario Electrical Safety Code and the OMAFRA factsheet, Electrical Systems in Barns.4. Perform Hot Works SafelyWhen using such things as welders and blow torches make sure to do the work in well-ventilated areas outside buildings. If the work needs to be done inside farm buildings, ensure the area is well ventilated, remove all combustible materials, place non-combustible pads under the work area, and have a fire extinguisher readily accessible.5. Participate in a Risk Reduction Assessment with Insurance or Fire DepartmentsMany insurance companies and fire departments offer onsite reviews or risk reduction assessments for farms. Take advantage of these opportunities to help identify potential risks and get recommendations to address concerns.6. Prepare and Implement a Fire Safety PlanA fire safety plan can help ensure a farm operation is regularly maintaining safety equipment, avoiding or reducing high risk activities and is prepared to respond to a fire.7. Regularly Inspect and Maintain Fire Walls, Fire Separations and Attic Fire StopsFire walls, fire separations and attic fire stops can slow down the progression of a fire within a building and increase the time for people to escape.8. Regularly Maintain HeatersEnsure heaters are properly installed, regularly maintained, and suspended well above combustibles or where they cannot be damaged by livestock.9. Store and Maintain Motorized Equipment Away From LivestockMotorized equipment, such as tractors, produce significant amounts of heat, even after being turned off and stored. This heat can dry debris caught in the equipment and cause the material to ignite. In addition, motorized equipment can develop electrical/mechanical failures that provide additional sources of ignition.10. Store Combustibles in a Designated Location Away From LivestockCombustibles such as straw or oil provide the fuel to feed a fire. Isolating these materials in a separate area reduces the risk of a fire spreading throughout the barn.Visit Ontario.ca/preventfarmfires for more details on the top 10 ways to reduce the risk of barn fires or find out about the other resources provided by OMAFRA, including new videos on how to reduce the risk.
The Ontario government recently unveiled new resources to help farmers reduce the risk of barn fires this winter, the time when most barn fires occur.The Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs released a series of new videos on ways to prevent barn fires. The videos are part of an ongoing effort with farmers and industry to develop different ways to reduce the potential loss of human and animal lives, injury and property damage from barn fires. Visit Ontario.ca\preventfarmfires to learn more about preventing barn fires, and to view these recently added resources: factsheet on the 10 ways to reduce the risk of barn fires video on good housekeeping practices in barns video on safety practices regarding electrical equipment video on safety practices when performing hotworks such as welding, grinding and torching Preparation and planning are also crucial in barn fire prevention: Have a contingency plan ready to deal with any emergency. Develop a preventative maintenance and housekeeping schedule. Have buildings inspected and maintained regularly by a licensed electrical contractor. Work with the local fire department and insurance company to identify any problem areas, and fix those problems. Train family and employees on what to do if there is a barn fire.
Canadian Bio-Systems Inc. (CBS Inc.) has launched a new yeast-based feed additive.Yeast Bioactives technology is designed for use as a feed supplement in diets for poultry, swine and ruminants.The company says it fits as an enhanced yeast and grain management option with advantages for all types of production systems, including those targeting reduction or replacement of antimicrobial use.It launched the product on December 1, the same date new antimicrobial use rules take effect in Canada, in several product lines as part of the company’s Feed Science Platforms portfolio.“The introduction of Yeast Bioactives technology is a major innovation for the global animal feed sector that comes at an important time of industry evolution,” says Rob Patterson, CBS Inc. Technical Director.“It represents a leap forward in consistency and efficacy compared to conventional yeast cell wall components used in animal feed. It offers a unique solution that addresses many of the current trends and needs of the industry.”The new Yeast Bioactives technology stems from multiple years of discovery research by CBS Inc. in partnership with the novel feed technology research program led by Dr. Bogdan Slominski at the University of Manitoba.Through that research it has reportedly shown properties and activities that help to mitigate a number of potential threats that can undermine feed quality, animal performance, animal health and food safety.It has also shown a high level of prebiotic activity that further supports an optimal environment for animal wellness, performance and related productivity, the company says.“Yeast Bioactives technology can be used consistently as an ongoing safeguard and support for optimal health, performance and productivity under a variety of production systems,” says Paul Garvey, CBS Inc. poultry sales manager.“It can also be used as a tool to support strategies for antimicrobial reduction or replacement. As a bio-based feed ingredient, it fits the type of solution favored not only on-farm but also by retail customers and consumers of animal-based food products.”
Merck Animal Health (known as MSD Animal Health outside the United States and Canada) announced a collaboration agreement with Rapid Genomics which grants the company exclusive rights to Rapid Genomics’ vaccination verification tool, Viral Flex-Seq. This tool will be utilized in combination with Merck Animal Health’s Innovax range of vaccines, including Innovax-ND-IBD, a unique vaccine that provides long-term protection against three infectious poultry diseases, Newcastle Disease (ND), Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD) and Marek’s Disease (MD), in a single dose. The collaboration was announced at the 2019 International Production & Processing Expo (IPPE) being held in Atlanta, Georgia, from February 12-14, 2019.“This partnership will bring together Merck Animal Health’s unique broad vaccine product line and Rapid Genomics’ innovative vaccination verification test, to optimize and enhance disease outbreak management in poultry for improved animal health and welfare,” said Taylor Barbosa, DVM, Ph.D., ACPV, Executive Director, Global Poultry Marketing, MSD Animal Health. “As the poultry industry grows, there is an increased need for improving disease control to optimize productivity and we are committed to growing with the industry to bring innovative solutions to our customers.”Viral Flex-Seq is a product that provides a highly sensitive and accurate result to confirm the presence of the vaccine replication in the bird. Viral Flex-Seq uses next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, an advanced method of genomic analysis, to specifically detect replication of Innovax vaccines and differentiate them from field viruses.“We are proud and excited to partner with Merck Animal Health, an industry-leading poultry vaccine company,” said Richard Currie, BVM&S, Ph.D., CEO, Rapid Genomics. “This partnership supports our mission as innovators in the field of genomic testing to set the standard for HVT vector vaccine detection and associated infectious pathogen diagnosis.”
Tommy Bagwell, former chairman & CEO of American Proteins, was honored by U.S. Poultry & Egg Association during the 2019 International Production & Processing Expo, where he received the Harold E. Ford Lifetime Achievement Award. This prestigious honor was presented to Bagwell by Tom Hensley, president of Fieldale Farms and outgoing USPOULTRY chairman.The Harold E. Ford Lifetime Achievement Award is presented to an individual whose dedication and leadership over the years have far exceeded the ordinary and impacted both the poultry industry and U.S. Poultry & Egg Association in an exemplary manner. The award is presented non-annually and when the Awards and Recognition Committee unanimously recognizes and endorses the need for occasional, unique recognition for exceptional contributions.“The connecting ties and friendship between Tommy, American Proteins and USPOULTRY are long and deep. In fact, it was Tommy’s father, Leland, who hired Harold Ford, for whom this award is named. It is a privilege to work with Tommy, and we are honored to present this award,” remarked John Starkey, president of USPOULTRYA native of North Georgia, Bagwell earned a degree in economics from Clemson University with a minor in Spanish. He also completed graduate studies in industrial management, business administration and economics at Clemson and the University of Georgia.In 1969, Bagwell began his professional career at North Georgia Rendering Co, now known as American Proteins, Inc. In 1972, upon the death of his father Leland, Bagwell became president. Today, American Proteins services the poultry industry from plants in Georgia and Alabama and supplies feed ingredients throughout the world. American Proteins was sold to Tyson Foods last year.Bagwell has been an active member of the Republican Regents and Republican Governors Association for the past several years. He was appointed a member of the Governor’s Energy Policy Council. He has also served as election observer for the Carter Center in Venezuela and Peru.Bagwell is involved in numerous local organizations. He has been a board member of the NE Georgia Council of Boy Scouts, charter president of the Forsyth County Rotary Club, and served as a trustee of Kennesaw State University, Lanier Technical College and Brenau University. He also serves on the U.S. Poultry & Egg Harold E. Ford Foundation board of directors. In 2014, Bagwell received the Philanthropist of the Year Award from the North Georgia Community Foundation.
As a celebration of exceptional performance and dedication to poultry breeding, Cobb-Vantress recently presented its annual Flock Awards to North American poultry customers who demonstrated remarkable results in 2018.Launched in 2004, the awards program recognizes top-performing facilities in the United States, Canada, Mexico and Central America that are maximizing the genetic potential of Cobb breeding stock. Each year, the Cobb technical services team conducts an annual Sold Flock Breeder Survey to determine the award recipients based on egg production, hatchability, chicks per hen housed and life of flock hen mortality.Cobb representatives announced the winners in January and will host individual ceremonies to present winners with plaques to commemorate their achievements.“With the support of our dedicated technical service team, our customers continue to exceed the possibilities of Cobb breeder performance each year,” said Ken Semon, senior director of technical service for Cobb North America. “Their commitment to excellence is unparalleled, which is evident in the high level of performance these winners achieved last year. All of the winners should be proud of their accomplishments, and our top performers will continue to serve as motivation, driving the North American poultry breeding industry to newfound levels of success.”The full list of 2018 North American winners include: Award                  Cobb-Vantress Customer Location Country Co-National Best, Cobb500 George’s Inc. Harrisonburg, Va. United States Co-National Best, Cobb500 Pilgrim’s Harrisonburg, Va. United States Co-National Best, Cobb700 Tyson Foods, Inc. Noel, Mo. United States Co-National Best, Cobb700 Tyson Foods, Inc. Oglethorpe, Ga. United States Cobb500 Fast Feather Top Flock Producer Pilgrim’s Moorefield, W.Va. United States Cobb500 Slow Feather Top Flock Producer Pitman Family Farms Sanger, Calif. United States Cobb700 Top Flock Producer Peco Foods, Inc. Sebastopol, Miss. United States Cobb500 Package Top Flock Producer Tyson Foods, Inc. Snead, Ala. United States National Best Synergy Agri Group Inc. Port Williams, Nova Scotia Canada Cobb500 Fast Feather Synergy Agri Group Inc. Port Williams, Nova Scotia Canada Cobb500 Slow Feather Cooperative Fédérée De Quebec Victoriaville, Quebec Canada Total Eggs Per Hen Hatched (Mx x 500F) Synergy Agri Group Inc. Port Williams, Nova Scotia Canada Regional Best, Cobb500 CMI-IP – Avicola Villalobos Guatemala City Guatemala Cobb500 Fast Feather CMI-IP – Avicola Pollo Rey San Jose Costa Rica Cobb500 Slow Feather CMI-IP – Avicola Villalobos Guatemala City Guatemala Mexico Best, Cobb500 Buenaventura Villaflores, Chiapas Mexico  “It is a great privilege to be receive the Best Cobb Package award,” said David Pruitt, breeder hatchery manager at the Tyson Foods, Inc. facility in Snead, Alabama, and winner of the Cobb500 Package Top Flock Producer award. “It was a team effort – and one that would not have been possible without the family of one of our dedicated growers coming together after losing their father midway through the flock.”
Cobb-Vantress announced today the release of new management guides and product supplements as part of the company’s enhancements to its Cobb Academy program. These resources were updated to reflect top-performing flocks, and provide best practices and recommendations to help maximize genetic potential.The refreshed guides and supplements are presented in a color-coded format to ensure that customers and distributors are able to easily find the information they need. All materials were crafted by Cobb’s world technical support and regional technical teams. This highly specialized international group covers a range of disciplines including hatchery, breeder and broiler management; microbiology; veterinary medicine; nutrition; environmental control; and processing.“We’re committed to the success of our customers, taking every action we can to help them succeed and maximize the genetic potential of their flocks — and ultimately their bottom line,” said Robin Jarquin, director of world technical support at Cobb-Vantress. “We know our guides and supplements are an important resource and a popular feature with our customers, so we hope they enjoy the updated materials complete with current data and newly available best practices compiled by our team of experts. We are committing to updating these materials more frequently to ensure our customers always have the best information for their operations.”Cobb’s team updated nine pieces in total, including: Broiler Management Guide Cobb500 supplements: Cobb500 Slow Feather Breeder Management Supplement Cobb500 Slow Feather Parent Laying/Rearing Chart (available in pounds and grams) Cobb500 Fast Feather Breeder Management Supplement Cobb500 Fast Feather Parent Laying/Rearing Chart (available in pounds and grams) Cobb500 Broiler Performance and Nutrition Supplement Cobb700 supplements: Cobb700 Breeder Management Supplement Cobb700 Parent Laying/Rearing Chart (available in pounds and grams) CobbMV Male Supplement Cobb updated these materials as part of its effort to enhance its Academy portal (available at www.cobb-vantress.com/academy), an extensive database of knowledge collected from Cobb experts across the globe. In addition to management guides and supplements, Cobb Academy also features a library of articles highlighting the latest technical information and industry best practices, as well as a series of videos sharing information directly from the company’s experts.All updated materials are available now in the Academy section of Cobb’s website and on the Cobb Connection mobile app, and will be available in print at Cobb’s booth at the International Production & Processing Expo in Atlanta February 12-14, 2019.Resources are currently available in English, with select pieces in Spanish. Soon, all resources will be available in the various languages Cobb supports.
On the heels of a recent report by Canadian Poultry magazine, which identified a steady and growing preference for chicken as the most chosen protein source among Canadians, the popular global fried chicken chain, Church's Chicken, has announced the addition of four new franchisees to the brand's growing Canadian landscape."The growing chicken market in Canada has been a key component of our expansion strategy in the western hemisphere," said Eduardo Garcia, Senior Director of Americas Business for Church's Chicken. "The fact that we've been able to successfully initiate not just one, but four new franchise relationships, is a testament to the brand's reputation of having a quality product and strong business model."Mian Nadeem will be leading their new franchise operations in Southwest Ontario to include York, Hamilton, Niagara, Waterloo, and Wellington-Peel as well as the municipalities of Oakville and Burlington, where the team also owns a real estate brokerage – The Empire Realty Point, a real estate development company under the same Empire umbrella, and a master franchise agreement with Freedom mobile throughout Ontario.Another new franchisee for the York Region is a group of brothers. This group is a dynamic Ontario-based company headed by three co-entrepreneurs: Arslan Ahmad, Irfan Ahmad, and Rizwan Ahmad. The brothers and partners come from a successful business family with vast experience in retail and customer service. All the brothers are very passionate about the Quick Service Restaurant (QSR) industry, and the Church's brand in particular. "Our group and team are optimistic hard workers who will put in the effort and service it takes to make Church's Chicken Canada's favorite fried chicken restaurant," offered Operating Principal Arslan Ahmad.Leading the development in the Durham Region of the Greater Toronto Area will be a group of investors led by the group's Operating Principal, Mr. Shazaib Shah. In addition to Shazaib, the group's directors are Muneer Khan, Ashraf Salem, and Abdul Khan. Together, the group has more than 20 years of expertise in quick service restaurants and retail markets bringing insight from multiple business disciplines. "What started off as a family dream of being able to one day serve what we love, we are honored and eager to bring the love of bold Texas flavor and quality fried chicken to our home in Canada," said Shah.In Alberta, Fays Enterprises Ltd, under the leadership of CEO Mian Ahmad and operating partner Yasir Saeed, bring a combined 20+ years in the food and retail industry, and are looking forward to extending the Church's Chicken quality food and genuine hospitality experience to the people of Edmonton. "We take great pride in upholding the top-notch industry standards and guest satisfaction people associate with Church's products," said Mian."We're very eager to see all of these new franchisees bring the Church's Chicken brand front and center in consumers' minds when it comes to quality food and superior value," said Tony Moralejo, Executive Vice President of International Business for Church's Chicken/Texas Chicken. "Church's is expanding across Canada building on our already strong presence in Vancouver. Our ultimate goal is to become the top chicken choice for the ever-growing number of Canadians who love eating deliciously prepared chicken."
Trillium Hatchery
Canada’s poultry industry has complex research needs. Chicken, egg and turkey producers as well as breeders, hatcheries and processors all face their own challenges and demands.
It’s here – Canadian Poultry’s first roundup of poultry research studies, from compounds in eggs that prevent human health issues to seaweed and insect meal as feed ingredients.
Nutrition company Jefo officially announced its plan to build a new 200 000 square feet production plant in Saint-Hyacinthe, Que.This new building, estimated at $30 million, will be located in the Théo-Phénix Industrial Park.The area, acquired in 2018, is strategic due to its proximity to the other Jefo Group facilities, which include a transportation company, a transshipment site, research centres for poultry nutrition, warehouses, the production plant and more."We aim to generate 1 billion dollars in revenue by 2025, so this project is necessary to support our current growth and ambitious goal," says Jean-François Fontaine, vice president of the Jefo Group."In addition to increasing our production capacity, the new production plant will reduce the risk of producing in a single facility."The first phase of the project consists of two production lines, with potential expansion to six lines, which translates to the creation of 20 new jobs in the near future and 60 in the long run.Jefo's current production plant features four production lines that generate more than 5,000 tons of animal feed additives annually.These products are marketed in more than 80 countries.
A replica of an Aviagen hatchery and delivery truck are currently on display in a 9-by-36-foot poultry industry diorama – a miniature model exhibited at the Georgia Poultry Lab in Gainesville since 2017. Aviagen is a sponsor of the diorama, and the hatchery shown is based on the company’s Sallisaw, Okla., facility.With an HO-scale electric train running through its landscape, the diorama depicts the entire poultry value chain – from a pullet farm, breeder farm, hatchery and broiler farm, to a processing plant, feed mill and commercial egg farm. The scene closes at the Port of Savannah, through which poultry is exported to other countries. A video walk-through of the entire diorama is available at www.gapoultrylab.org/poultry-diorama/.Promoting public awareness of poultry health and welfareThe diorama helps the lab fulfil its goal of educating the public on an industry that represents a major part of the economy in Georgia, which is the top producer of poultry and broilers in the U.S. Aviagen currently has one hatchery in Blairsville, Ga., and a new hatchery now under construction in Quitman, Ga., is slated to open in the spring of 2019.The Georgia Poultry Lab hosts regular public tours led by poultry health experts, who educate the public on the great care that is taken to keep the industry healthy. The diorama is located in the lab’s mezzanine, where groups can biosecurely view the lab activities below through large windows.“Aviagen is committed to the health, welfare and biosecurity of our poultry throughout the value chain, and this is a commitment we share with the Georgia Poultry Lab. We’re proud to sponsor the diorama exhibit, as it is part of the lab’s efforts to build public confidence in our industry,” explained Aviagen Vice President of Veterinary Services Dr. Eric Jensen.“The diorama gives us an opportunity to explain all aspects of the industry, from live production to exports, to groups that range from middle school kids to international delegations, without going to farms or plants,” added Dr. Louise Dufour-Zavala, executive director of the Georgia Poultry Lab. “It also helps children understand where their food is coming from!”
Egg Farmers of Canada is honoured to be named as one of Canada’s Top Employers for Young People for 2019. The award recognizes the best workplaces across Canada for young people starting their careers right out of university.“Young people are tremendously valuable in our workplace. They bring fresh, new ideas to the table, and are keen to develop and hone their skills,” says Tim Lambert, chief executive officer at Egg Farmers of Canada. “We want to provide the best developmental opportunities for all our employees, and we want to help guide and grow our young people to be successful in their careers.”Egg Farmers of Canada’s employee-centric culture and a commitment to giving back to the community are just some of the reasons why young people want to work there. Careers are enriched through professional development and specialized leadership training. Staff have a range of opportunities to grow in their role, take on a great deal of ownership towards their projects, and participate in activities that directly engage them in our commitment to giving back.This approach to human resources and employee engagement complements Egg Farmers of Canada’s mission to position the egg industry as a leader in Canada’s agricultural future, and their vision where everyone—whether it be due to want or need—can enjoy the immeasurable benefits of the humble egg.While this is the first time Egg Farmers of Canada has received this honour, they have been named as one of Canada’s Most Admired Corporate Cultures by Waterstone Human Capital since 2014 and a National Capital Region’s Top Employer for six consecutive years. These recognitions demonstrate Egg Farmers of Canada’s commitment to their employees, and young people are no exception.
Maggie Van Camp is the new National Agricultural Practice Development Leader for BDO Canada, based out of the Guelph, Ont. office. Van Camp comes to BDO with decades of experience in agricultural publishing — most recently, 11 years as Senior Business Editor with Country Guide. She has developed a reputation for integrity, consistently sourcing practical business information for farmers and strategically identifying paramount issues for the agricultural industry."As Canadian farms and agri-businesses get more complex, they need better, more in-depth professional services and financial advice," says Van Camp. “BDO's accountants are smart, skilled, and passionate about agriculture. It's a perfect fit.""As National Agriculture Group Industry Leader, I am so excited about Maggie joining our team. Her vast agricultural knowledge and experience will enhance the level of service we are able to provide our agricultural clients,” says BDO Partner Mark Verwey. Van Camp is also CEO and owner of Redcrest Farms, a broiler farm near Blackstock, Ont. Prior to farming, she lived and worked in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Southwestern Ontario. Van Camp is a director for the Eastern Canadian Farm Writers Association. She was previously a 4-H leader and on the county board executive, and she has volunteered at her local fair and church.
As the Canadian poultry industry continually improves bird welfare, it’s incorporating new research and technologies into transport and handling.
More than half the food produced in Canada is wasted and the average kitchen tosses out hundreds of dollars worth of edibles every year, says a study researchers are calling the first of its kind.''It's a lot of food,'' said Lori Nikkel of Second Harvest, the Toronto-based group working to reduce food waste that commissioned the study.''We waste more food than we consume.''The study released Thursday is the world's first to measure food waste using data from industry and other sources instead of estimates, said Martin Gooch of Value Chain Management International, which conducted the study.Value Chain works with agriculture, aquaculture, marine and food industries to make them more profitable.''What we did was actually go to industry and (said), 'Give us primary data,''' Gooch said. ''This is the first time anywhere in the world that anyone's gone out and got primary data that connects production with consumers.''Results were checked with industry experts.''At every point in the process, we ground-truthed it,'' said Gooch. ''We're confident our results are conservative.''Previous work has suggested that Canadians waste almost 400 kilograms of food per person, one of the world's highest totals. The new work adds considerable detail to that figure.Apples rot in the grass for lack of harvest workers. Surplus milk is flushed. Thousands of hectares of produce are plowed after cancelled orders.The report, funded largely by the Walmart Foundation, concludes 58 per cent of Canadian food production is wasted.That includes unavoidable waste such as animal bones. But a solid one-third of the waste _ more than 11 million tonnes _ could be recovered.The report says the value of usable groceries that wind up in landfills or other disposal sites is almost $50 billion. That's more than half the amount Canadians spend on food every year and is enough to feed every Canadian for five months.As well, it says avoidable food waste in Canada produces more than 22 million tonnes of climate-changing carbon dioxide emissions.The report says processing and manufacturing are the largest sources of avoidable waste, accounting for 43 per cent of it. Produce that doesn't meet exacting grading standards, inaccurate market forecasts and inefficient processes are all part of the problem.So are date codes which remove perfectly healthy food from the market.''Best-before doesn't mean awful-after,'' said Nikkel.Canadian kitchens are also conspicuous wastrels, responsible for 21 per cent of avoidable waste. That's about $1,700 per household in a country in which four million people struggle for regular meals.Hospitals, restaurants and institutions contribute 13 per cent of avoidable food waste. Retail outlets are close behind at 12 per cent.Farmers waste only six per cent of the usable food they produce. Distributors waste even less at five per cent.The report details many ways waste could be cut. Better co-ordination between farmer and processor, changes to crop insurance, clearer date codes, improved safety assessments for donated food and liability reform could all help keep nutrition out of the garbage and on somebody's plate.Even avoiding bulk buys that result in excess being tossed away would help, said Nikkel.Canadians should change their attitude toward food, she added.''We've cheapened it so much that it doesn't have value any more. It would horrify our grandparents.''We need to go back to that valuing of food.''
It’s long been standard industry practice to remove the tip of a bird’s beak in an effort to minimize the severity of cannibalism in poultry flocks. For at least the last decade, many Canadian hatcheries have primarily been using an infrared beak treatment. While research has been conducted on the impacts on adult hens, there has been little focus on how it affects young pullets.
How do you measure a chicken’s happiness? Is it in the way it runs for food? How much time it spends preening?To size up what might make chickens happy in their brief lives, researchers at the University of Guelph putting 16 breeds through physical fitness and behavioural tests. They’re watching how well birds scramble over a barrier for food, how skittish they seem and whether they play with a fake worm.Chickens can’t say how they feel, but playing with a fake worm may be a sign of happiness.For the full story, CLICK HERE.
Global animal health and nutrition company Alltech has launched a new poultry feed additive it says aids in optimizing gut form and function.Called Viligen, the company says it contains a range of new, scientifically-backed ingredients to support gastrointestinal tissue growth and activity.It blends fatty acids, prebiotics and essential trace elements, which Alltech’s researchers say combine to promote beneficial bacteria in the gut and support natural defenses.“This product supports growth, intestinal integrity and the bird’s own natural immune defenses,” said Dr. Kayla Price, Canadian poultry technical manager at Alltech.“We believe that this product may help poultry producers in Canada knowing that better intestinal health leads to improved performance.”Viligen is a part of the Alltech Gut Health Management program as well as the Alltech Antibiotic-Free and Alltech Antibiotic Reduction programs.
SELEGGT, a joint venture between HatchTech, German supermarket chain REWE and the University of Leipzig, has developed a market-ready method for gender identification in hatching eggs.In Germany, supermarkets are already selling eggs from 'hens without brothers'.The eggs from which the laying hens are born have been checked on the genus during the incubation process.In the SELEGGT method, a laser burns a hole of no more than 0.3 millimetres into the hatching egg shell.Afterwards, a small amount of fluid is extracted through a non-invasive procedure. Hence the interior of the hatching egg is untouched and remains safe and sound.Through a change in colour, a marker will indicate whether the sex-specific hormone estrone sulphate can be detected in the hatching egg.If detected, a female chick is developing in the hatching egg. Consequently, only female chicks hatch on the 21st day of the incubation.No estrone sulphate indicates a male hatching egg, which is separated and processed into high-quality animal feed.The developers expect the method will prevent millions of male day-old chicks from being gassed.In Germany alone, around 45 million male chicks from laying hen breeds are killed every year.German Federal Minister of Food and Agriculture Julia Klöckner welcomed the news. “This is a great day for animal welfare in Germany!”Jan Kunath, the Deputy Chief Executive Officer of REWE Group, adds, “Throughout next year, our customers will be able to buy the so called free-range respeggt-eggs gradually throughout Germany.”At the same time, SELEGGT is developing a business model to make the technology available to the industry as a cost-neutral service.The patented process will be available to the first hatcheries from 2020.Canadian researchers at McGill University, with support from Egg Farmers of Ontario, have been developing their own gender identification technology for several years.Called Hypereye, the patented scanning device is still being fine-tuned and recently received $844,000 in funding from the federal government to help get it to market.
The level of early chick mortality (ECM) is one of the crucial factors that determines the quality of chicken production and, hence, the economic return from a poultry production unit. Yolk sac infection (YSI) has been reported as the most frequent cause of ECM, and in recent years significant increase in ECM due to YSI has emerged as a threat to broiler operations in parts of Canada. 
Undercover video. Two words that will send shivers up the spine of anyone who works in agriculture and food. There have been well over 200 undercover videos in the U.S. and 16 in Canada since 2012 targeting agriculture from farms through to processing. While it’s human nature to hope one never focuses on you, your company, suppliers or customers – it’s always better to be prepared.
Research shows that under natural conditions, domestic fowl spend 70 per cent of their active time foraging by walking on the ground because their flight abilities are limited. When threatened or roosting, domestic hens seek elevated refuges. For roosting, birds fly up to the lowest branch of a tree and seek higher elevation by flying branch-to-branch, whereas they descend by flying directly to the ground. Hens use their wings only for brief escape flights.
A major challenge to controlling avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is achieving protection against the numerous types of the virus circulating in commercial poultry.
There’s a new poultry ration ingredient available on the Canadian market. Insect meal from defatted black soldier fly larvae is high in protein and low in fat, making it a potentially attractive alternative to soy in poultry diets.
In a $1-million, first-of-its-kind study at the University of Guelph, upwards of 10,000 chickens – all wearing fitbit-like devices to track their activity levels – are being monitored in research to improve health and welfare of hundreds of millions of birds raised in North American poultry operations.The study, headed by animal welfare expert and U of G professor Tina Widowski, is expected to provide key information for ensuring that broiler chickens – the world’s most popular meat – are raised not just quickly and efficiently but ethically as well.“Animal welfare has become a big part of the notion of sustainability – how to improve welfare and create a healthy environment, and how to make it economically feasible,” Widowski says.About 23 billion broiler chickens are produced worldwide; Canada produced more than 700 million of the birds in 2017.Most North American broiler chickens are conventional, fast-growing birds that reach a market weight of 2.1 kilograms in about 35 days.Developed over the past half-century through a combination of selective breeding and genetics, better nutrition and improved husbandry practices, those growth speedsters also pack on proportionately more breast meat and less bone.But fast-growing modern broilers are susceptible to immune system and musculoskeletal problems, said Widowski, an animal biosciences professor and holder of the Egg Farmers of Canada Chair in Poultry Welfare and the Col. K.L. Campbell University Chair in Animal Welfare.Often, their legs are not strong enough to support their meaty bodies, making it difficult for the birds to walk. These sedentary chickens spend much of their time sitting and lying on litter in their free-run houses, which can lead to foot and skin problems, she said.“Animal welfare concerns for these fast-growing chickens have led to the development of new, slower-growing genotypes,” Widowski says.Slow-growing chickens take at least a week longer to reach market weight than conventional birds and are reported to have improved welfare and better meat, she added.Broiler chicken health and welfare is a focus of the Global Animal Partnership (GAP), an organization based in Austin, Texas. Over the past year, dozens of multinational restaurants, grocers and food service companies have pledged to source only broilers raised under GAP standards.However, conventional chicken producers argue that raising birds more slowly will add expense, particularly in extra feed, which accounts for about 70 per cent of producer costs. “It’s a very contentious issue,” Widowski says.What’s missing in the debate, she said, is research to back up those welfare standards and to determine optimum breeds and management methods. Looking for that information, GAP came to U of G for help.“There’s been no comprehensive look at health, welfare, nutrition, environment and meat characteristics,” Widowski says.Referring to the University’s strengths in poultry science and welfare, she adds, “Here at Guelph, we have the capacity to do that.”U of G researchers are now assessing 20 strains of conventional and slow-growing breeds. They’re tending about 1,000 birds at a time, hatched from eggs supplied by the world’s largest breeding companies.Three grad students and a post-doc researcher are tracking the birds with various instruments, including the “chicken fitbits.”By monitoring behaviour, physiology, health, production and meat quality, the team hopes to nail down welfare indicators for all strains.“This study will provide information people can use to make decisions,” says Stephanie Torrey, a senior research associate in the Department of Animal Biosciences.U of G received a total of about $1 million for the study from GAP, U of G’s Food from Thought project and the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs.
NSF International, a global public health and safety organization known for food safety and quality, launched new Global Animal Wellness Standards to address the full lifecycle of all key species and establish best practices for how animals are kept, raised and responsibly managed. The standards are the first of their kind in establishing a universal approach to animal health and wellness.As the food industry becomes increasingly attuned to consumer and investor expectations and the high demand for transparent animal welfare practices, it’s becoming imperative for organizations to define, implement and measure proper management systems for animal health, welfare, handling and care.NSF Global Animal Wellness Standards establish best practices by benchmarking against global animal welfare regulations and domestic animal welfare regulatory requirements, industry standards and codes of practices. Inspired by the Five Freedoms of Animal Welfare and consistent with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and World Organisation of Animal Health (OIE) guidelines, NSF Global Animal Wellness Standards establish clear criteria to verify robust animal wellness management systems for beef and dairy cattle, poultry (including egg-laying), small ruminants and hogs. The standards are globally applicable, as they account for variability in regulatory requirements and variations in consumer pressure. Key areas include: Animal sources, health and safety Design, maintenance and protection in animal environment, facilities and equipment Animal handling, husbandry and management commitment to animal wellness culture Feed and water Developed by NSF International, the Global Animal Wellness Standards were reviewed by an independent panel representing industry, academia and regulatory authorities. Technical experts from Canada, the U.S., the UK and South America were selected for their expertise including Dr. Temple Grandin, a Colorado State University animal science professor and livestock consultant. Dr. Grandin directly contributed to the review of the NSF Religious Slaughter standards, a component of the Global Animal Wellness Standards.To achieve compliance, a facility must establish, document and implement an animal welfare management system. The standards have three tiers so there is opportunity for specifying customers to bring suppliers on board at the baseline, but encourage growth and development to achieve higher levels of compliance. The baseline level provides an entry point for farms or facilities in developing markets where practices have not yet been formalized. The next tier is “assurance” and provides specifiers with confidence that suppliers are operating with best practices in animal wellness. The third and highest tier is “certification” which demonstrates total commitment and compliance. All levels require independent audits to verify compliance and include zero tolerance for animal abuse, mistreatment or neglect.“Animal welfare is an issue that impacts the agricultural and food production industry across the globe,” said Robert Prevendar, Global Managing Director of Supply Chain Food Safety at NSF International. “NSF International’s Global Animal Wellness Standards are designed to be relevant in every country, region and market. The standards ensure specifiers, facilities and producers that a strong, consistent animal wellness system is instituted wherever animals and animal products are sourced.”
Happy New Year! As you’ll read in the pages ahead, we’re ringing in 2019 with an eye towards the future. This issue is focused on the research and innovations that will help shape the industry in the coming years.
Most Canadians celebrate innovation when it comes to their phones, cars and medical breakthroughs. Break out the party horns!
The federal government says it plans to spend $1.75 billion by March without having said what the money is for, though at least some of the cash is likely to go to farmers hurt by new trade deals.The government remains tight-lipped about how it will use the rest of the ''non-announced'' spending it allowed for in last week's fall economic statement.In all, the government has made room for $9.5 billion worth of still-to-be-unveiled commitments over the next six years.A government source says some of that will go to dairy, egg and poultry producers, whose protected domestic markets were opened up to more foreign competition under new North American and Pacific Rim trade deals. The source, who was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly, spoke on condition of anonymity.The fall statement said the government is still talking with farmers and processors about compensation for the new United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) and the recently ratified Asia-Pacific trade pact known as the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP).The negotiations will determine the size of the final package and how the money will be rolled out over the coming years.In 2016, the Liberal government dedicated $350 million to help dairy producers deal with the impacts of Canada's trade agreement with the European Union. The amount included a five-year, $250-million fund for milk producers and a second program worth $100 million for cheese-makers.The Liberals also have outstanding mandate commitments they will be looking to address before the 2019 election campaign and, looking further ahead, Ottawa is facing litigation related to Indigenous issues, including land claims. Both could draw on some of the money.Most of the yet-to-be announced funding has been dedicated to the later years of the projection, with $2.1 billion set aside for 2021-22, $1.85 billion for 2022-23 and nearly $2.8 billion for 2023-24.One possible use for the cash: national pharmacare.The governing Liberals have put together a group of advisers to consult Canadians and to explore options for a national program. The council is due to report in 2019, when the topic of pharmacare is likely to become an issue during the election campaign.A spokesman for Finance Minister Bill Morneau argued the list of the government's funding commitments in the fall update is comprehensive.But Pierre-Olivier Herbert noted some measures cannot be disclosed yet due to cabinet confidentiality or because ministers have yet to make decisions. Issues of national security, commercial sensitivity, litigation or certain matters related to trade agreements must also be kept under wraps, he said.''The net fiscal impact of these confidential or sensitive measures is rolled up and presented at an aggregate level and will be detailed in due time,'' Herbert wrote in an email.Thanks to the stronger economy, Morneau had more than $20 billion in extra fiscal room over the coming years to work with, compared to the forecasts in last February's budget.He chose to announce new initiatives – including billions of dollars worth of tax incentives for corporate Canada – that will use up all that space and then some, contributing to slightly larger annual deficits beginning next year.The document contained Ottawa's long-awaited plan to help the country compete with the U.S. for investment dollars. It came in response to major American tax and regulatory reforms that many in the business community warn have eliminated Canada's edge as an investment destination.The package includes new write-offs that are expected to lower federal revenues by about $14 billion over the next half-decade all by themselves.Peter DeVries, a former senior Finance Department official, said Morneau has now made spending commitments of nearly $33 billion over six years since the February budget. In comparison, he said the budget itself contained $20.3 billion worth of new measures, although the initiatives were aimed at a much-broader range of issues.''There's some big numbers in there,'' said DeVries, who writes articles about government finances and recently examined the fall statement.The next budget will serve as the Liberals' election platform, but DeVries wonders how the party will finance it.''Where are you going to find the money for that platform, unless you go into deficit even more or unless you believe that you've put aside sufficient reserves in the framework to manage it?'' he said. ''It doesn't look like they've done that, except for that one line that says (non-announced measures).''The fall update also contains no timeline to eliminate the Liberals' shortfalls, which are now projected to be higher than $18 billion in each of the next couple of years.The opposition Conservatives and some economists have criticized the Liberals for not providing a date to balance the budget. There are warnings the government could face big fiscal challenges when the next economic downturn arrives.After the 2015 election, the Trudeau government abandoned vows to run yearly shortfalls of no more than $10 billion and to balance the books by 2019.Instead, it has focused on reducing the net debt-to-GDP ratio – a measure of how burdensome the national debt is – each year.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau isn't ruling out the possibility that Canada will ratify its new North American trade deal with the United States and Mexico even if U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminum exports are still in place.In an interview with CNN, portions of which are airing as U.S. voters cast ballots in pivotal midterm elections, Trudeau says Canada still wants the tariffs lifted before the new version of NAFTA goes into effect.But when asked if he trusts U.S. President Donald Trump to honour the new U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, Trudeau says his father taught him to trust Canadians.He says it was Pierre Trudeau's way of telling him that he didn't have to scare or pander to voters in Canada, since they are capable of making intelligent, rational choices.Pressed on the question of whether he trusts Trump, Trudeau says he respects the fact that every leader has a different approach to the job of defending their country's interests.Trump is using national security grounds to justify tariffs of 10 per cent on aluminum produced outside the U.S. and 25 per cent on steel, and has not lifted his threat to impose a similar 25 per cent tariff on autos.''What my father taught me was to trust Canadians,'' Trudeau said when asked whether the elder Trudeau's advice to ''trust people'' would apply to the U.S. president.''It was a way of looking at the electorate as saying you don't have to dumb it down for them, you don't have to scare them into this or that - you can actually treat people like intelligent, rational actors and they will rise to the occasion.''Trudeau was pressed on whether he trusts Trump to stand by the terms of the USMCA.''Every leader has the job of sticking up for their own country, and they will do it in their own ways,'' he said.''I respect the fact that people have different approaches to it. My approach is to trust Canadians and deal in a way that is direct with other leaders.''
Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, Lawrence MacAulay, announced this week a new working group comprised of poultry and egg farmers and processors.While informal engagement has already begun with the poultry and egg sector, the working group brings together officials from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, representatives from national poultry and egg organizations and associations, as well as regional representatives.The working group will collaborate to develop strategies to fully and fairly support farmers and processors to help them adjust to the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA).It will also discuss support to reflect the impact of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP).In addition to discussing impacts of the trade agreements in the short term, the working group will also chart a path forward to help the poultry and egg sectors innovate and remain an important source of jobs and economic growth for future generations.Supporting expertise to the working group may also include academic leaders, as well as industry and financial experts, as necessary.The federal government will engage with provincial and territorial governments on an ongoing basis throughout the collaboration process.
Canadian Bio-Systems Inc. (CBS Inc.) has launched the main phase rollout of its new Feed Science Platforms, offering a comprehensive portfolio of advanced bio-based feed technology solutions to benefit swine, poultry, aquaculture and ruminant production.
At a time when the North American feed industry is undergoing a dramatic transformation driven by new rules, heightened market expectations and groundbreaking technology advances, a growing number of major farming operations are opting to take charge of their futures by embracing a stronger direct role in feed production and feed additive innovation.
Whole bird turkey sales in Canada have declined quite a bit over the last few years, especially during the last two. Still, the turkey sector in Canada and in the U.S. continues to find success building consumption of other products.
The International Egg Commission and its members support, and will promote, the responsible use of all antimicrobials to allow for the long-term safe production of eggs, safeguarding the availability of eggs and egg products for the world’s consumers.
Growing interest in the concept and practice of sustainable sourcing is redefining relationships and expectations in the agri-food landscape. Sustainable sourcing, simply put, refers to procurement of goods or services subject to their meeting a specified set of socio-economic, animal welfare and environmental sustainability criteria.
Canadian farmers are leaders in producing safe, high-quality agricultural and food products for Canadians and people around the world. The sector is a major driver in creating good, middle-class jobs, and is one of Canada's key growth industries.

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