Global
As it did for most livestock species, substantial genetic improvement in turkeys started in the 21st century. In the 1960s, hybridization of turkey varieties began, followed by the development of pedigree programs for large white turkeys in the 1970s.
Published in Genetics
Poultry groups have called it a giveaway, failure and deeply concerning. The reviews are in for the latest version of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade agreement. They aren’t good.
Published in Trade
Humane Farm Animal Care (HFAC), the leading international non profit certification program improving the lives of farm animals in food production, announced recently that the Certified Humane program has recently expanded into Argentina and Australia. Argentina and Australia rank among the largest food producers in the world.

Ovobrand Eggs in Argentina, and Cape Grim Beef in Australia, are among the newest producers and farmers to join the Certified Humane program – a program which requires farmers to adhere to HFAC's Animal Care Standards and be willing to submit to third-party inspections to confirm compliance for consumers.

Among other things, HFAC's Animal Care Standards requires that farm animals be fed nutritious diets without antibiotics, hormones, and animal by-products, and receive proper shelter, resting areas, and sufficient space to support natural behaviors.

"Just like every other animal, cows, farm animals deserve to have their emotional, mental and physical needs met and be kept in a way that allows them to express natural behaviors throughout their lives," says Adele Douglass, executive director of HFAC.

HFAC works to improve the lives of farm animals by driving consumer demand for kinder and more responsible farm animal practices. When consumers buy Certified Humane Raised and Handled food, they are recognizing farmers for raising their animals humanely.

Consumers can download the free Certified Humane® app to find Certified Humane products, which are currently available in 32,000 stores in eight countries – the U.S., Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Hong Kong, and Peru.

Since HFAC launched in May 2003, more than 172 companies, representing 6,000 farms and 835 million farm animals, have joined the Certified Humane program.

Endorsed by 67 humane organizations, the Certified Humane Raised and Handled program is considered the "Gold Standard" for certifying farm animal welfare, from birth through slaughter.

For more information on HFAC and the Certified Humane label, visit www.certifiedhumanebrasil.org or www.certifiedhumanelatino.org.
Published in News
DATE: March 22, 2018

LOCATION: Pellworm/Suderoog, Nordfriesland, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany

DETAILS: Information received from Dr. Karin Schwabenbauer, ministerial dirigentin and chief veterinary officer, Directorate of Animal Health, Animal Welfare, Bundesministerium für Ernährung und Landwirtschaft (BMEL), Bonn, Germany reported the recurrence of a listed disease in a backyard flock of rare and endangered breeds, including 44 chickens, seven geese, 19 ducks and three turkeys. All birds have been culled and safely disposed of. Restriction zones have been established and epidemiological investigations started. No bird or bird products have been dispatched to EU member states or third countries.

SOURCE:
http://www.promedmail.org/post/5703845
ProMED-mail post
http://www.promedmail.org/
ProMED-mail is a program of the International Society for Infectious Diseases
http://www.isid.org

Published in Disease watch
MSD Animal Health, known as Merck Animal Health in the United States and Canada, is proud to announce its sponsorship of the 2018 High Quality Poultry Science Award to be granted to three recently graduated students in veterinary or animal science in support of research in poultry health, production and welfare.

The award recipients will present their research to a number of industry specialists at upcoming MSD Animal Health High Quality Poultry meetings to be held in Asia, the Americas, and Europe in 2018.

"As a company committed to the Science of Healthier Animals, MSD Animal Health is proud to invest in the future of young researchers," said Taylor Barbosa, DVM, Ph.D., ACPV, executive director, Global Poultry Marketing, MSD Animal Health. "We believe this opportunity will help prepare students for their vital roles within the poultry industry and contribute to further innovation and advancements in poultry health and performance."

Eligible graduates must have completed, at minimum, a Master's or Doctoral degree in the past 12 months and have completed research for an applied project in either veterinary or animal science with an emphasis on poultry. Topics of interest include infectious diseases, vaccine development, Poultry Mite infestation control, gut health (Coccidiosis, Necrotic Enteritis), welfare, hatchery, antibiotic reduction, food safety (Salmonella, Campylobacter), and environmental impact.

To apply, candidates must submit a 300-word summary of their research project, resume and a brief letter, no longer than 300 words, describing why their work contributes to theimprovement of the poultry industry to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Applications must be submitted by April 27, 2018. The award recipients will be notified by June 1, 2018.

One student per region will be selected and must be available to travel and present their research in their respective regions in 3Q2018 (China), 3Q2018 (Argentina), and 4Q2018 (Europe). The company will assume responsibility for travel expenses incurred.
Published in News
Cobb-Brazil is investing more than one-million dollars in a new fleet of state-of-the-art chick transporters to make sure chicks arrive to customers in top condition. Brazil's large landscape with spread-out farms previously presented a challenge for conventional trailers without specialized climate control.

The first of the new vehicles has already proved its worth in delivering chicks with zero mortality and another six trailers will join the fleet by the end of March. The transporters were designed as part of a joint project with global trailer manufacturer Smithway and Brazil's Facchini, located in São Jose do Rio Preto where Cobb Brazil is headquartered.

The new trailer is equipped with a 100,000 BTU air conditioning system with generators to provide electricity for cooling and heating. The vehicle is designed without corridors so it can hold up to 60,000 chicks - twice the capacity of conventional trailers.

"During their first days chicks need to be kept in constant warmth to ensure good early development," said Lucas Lima, Cobb logistics manager in Brazil. "Conventional trailers depend greatly on the external climate as they are only equipped with humidification, exhaust and ventilation systems. We needed a trailer equipped with independent climate control to ensure the wellbeing and ideal environment for our chicks."

Two fuel-powered generators enable cooling even if the truck's engine is off - an essential feature that allows for periods when the driver is taking a break or, for instance, when the truck is waiting at the airport before loading. The generators operate separately, with the second one only used if the main generator fails.

Internal air quality control is also improved with the new technology. With little air exchange, the chance of harmful organisms circulating inside the trailer is reduced.

"We have been using the new transporter since November and are very pleased with the results," added Lima. "We have been working with near-zero mortality during chick transport as a result of the excellent temperature control and comfort within the trailers. Our goal is that the chicks are delivered to the customer in the same condition they left the hatchery."
Published in News
There is hardly a month that goes by without a new story on cultured meat or plant-based products that look, smell, cook and taste just like meat. Commercialization of both types of foods is moving forward.
Published in Emerging Trends
DATE: March 7, 2018

LOCATION: General Toshevo, Dobrich, Bulgaria

DETAILS: Bulgaria has reported an outbreak of the highly pathogenic H5N8 bird flu virus on a farm in the northeastern district of Dobrich, the national food safety agency said on [Mon 5 Feb 2018]. The virus, found on a farm in the town of General Toshevo, located near the border with Romania, would lead to the death of 140 000 birds, the agency said.

SOURCE:
http://www.promedmail.org/post/5669435
ProMED-mail post
http://www.promedmail.org/
ProMED-mail is a program of the International Society for Infectious Diseases
http://www.isid.org

Published in Disease watch
DATE: March 7, 2018

LOCATION: Tongchuan, Wangyi District, Shaanxi, and, Guilin, Lingchuan, Guangxi, China

DETAILS: Information of a reoccurrence of a listed disease received on March 7, 2018 from Dr. Zhang Zhongqui, director general, China Animal Disease Control Centre, Veterinary Bureau, Ministry of Agriculture, Beijing, China (People's Rep of). The outbreak status is continuing (or date resolved not provided).

SOURCE:
http://www.promedmail.org/post/5671741
ProMED-mail post
http://www.promedmail.org/
ProMED-mail is a program of the International Society for Infectious Diseases
http://www.isid.org

Published in Disease watch
DATE: March 6, 2018

LOCATION: Jasper County, Jasper, Missouri, U.S.A.

DETAILS: As part of routine, pre-slaughter testing and surveillance for H5/H7 Avian Influenza, H7N1 presumptive low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) was detected in a healthy commercial meat turkey flock based upon H7 PCR and antibody to H7 and N1; further characterization is pending virus recovery.

There have been no clinical signs of illness or increased mortality on the premises. This is the first detection of H7 LPAI in commercial poultry in the U.S. for 2018. The turkeys will be depopulated through controlled marketing. The USDA Animal Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and the Missouri Department of Agriculture are conducting a comprehensive epidemiological investigation and have implemented enhanced surveillance and testing related to this finding. A total of two additional commercial poultry premises located within the 10 km [approx. 6.2 mi] zone were tested negative for influenza virus.

SOURCE:
http://www.promedmail.org/post/5669435
ProMED-mail post
http://www.promedmail.org/
ProMED-mail is a program of the International Society for Infectious Diseases
http://www.isid.org

Published in Disease watch
DATE: March 5, 2018

LOCATION: Kujanga, Jagatsinghpur, Orissa

DETAILS: Information received of a recurrence of a listed disease on [and dated] March 1, 2018 from Mr Devendra Chaudhry, secretary, Animal Husbandry, Dairying & Fisheries, Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare, New Delhi, India. The outbreak status is continuing (or date resolved not provided).

SOURCE:
http://www.promedmail.org/post/5667511
ProMED-mail post
http://www.promedmail.org/
ProMED-mail is a program of the International Society for Infectious Diseases
http://www.isid.org

Published in Disease watch
DATE: March 3, 2018

LOCATION: Slagelse, Zealand, Denmark

DETAILS:
The [Danish] national veterinary institute, DTU Vet, has revealed it has discovered bird flu in a dead white-tailed eagle found near Slagelse in Zealand. According to the Food and Environment Ministry, the bird flu type is most likely H5H6, which is highly deadly to birds. There's no need for the public to be overly alarmed, said the ministry.

For now, the discovery won't lead to more stringent protocol for fowl farmers, but that could change should more contaminated birds be found, such as in late 2016. According to Larsen, it's the 1st instance of bird flu discovered in a wild bird in Denmark since April 2017. And there hasn't been a bird flu case among kept Danish birds since February 2017.

SOURCE:
http://www.promedmail.org/post/5662330
ProMED-mail post
http://www.promedmail.org/
ProMED-mail is a program of the International Society for Infectious Diseases
http://www.isid.org
Published in Disease watch
DATE: March 1, 2018

LOCATION: Olderkerk, Groningen, Netherlands

DETAILS:
An avian influenza event was confirmed on Feb. 26 as a reoccurrence of an existing disease. Outbreak status is continuing (or date resolved not provided).

SOURCE:
http://www.promedmail.org/post/5657770
ProMED-mail post
http://www.promedmail.org/
ProMED-mail is a program of the International Society for Infectious Diseases
http://www.isid.org
Published in Disease watch
Researchers at The Pirbright Institute have created a new method of genetically modifying the Marek’s disease vaccine so that it is able to protect against another destructive poultry virus called infectious bursal disease (IBD), and potentially others such as avian influenza and Newcastle disease. This approach could lead to a reduction in the number of vaccines that need to be administered to each bird.

For the first time, Pirbright scientists have been able to use a gene editing system called CRISPR/cas9 to add a gene of the IBD virus into a current Marek’s disease vaccine virus. The added genetic material protects poultry against IBD in addition to the protection already offered by the Marek’s disease vaccine, meaning that bird owners would only need to use one vaccine instead of two. For the full story, click here.
Published in News
Bluestar Adisseo Company recently announced that it has completed the acquisition of global feed additives producer Nutriad. This transaction is part of Adisseo's strategy to become one of the worldwide leaders of specialty additives in animal nutrition.

"We are pleased to have quickly brought the Nutriad acquisition to completion and excited to welcome Nutriad talents in the Adisseo team. This complementary combination supports our strategy for accelerating growth of our specialty products business. Together, we will set up an efficient organization which should allow us to strengthen our global product portfolio's competitiveness and its overall efficiency" said Adisseo CEO Jean-Marc Dublanc.

Nutriad CEO Erik Visser added, "The announcement of the acquisition of Nutriad by Adisseo has been met with overwhelming enthusiasm by our customers, suppliers, distribution partners and employees across the world. Now that we have confirmed the completion of the transaction, the Adisseo and Nutriad teams will jointly work with full energy and passion on the integration, committed to bringing further value adding solutions to the market."

Nutriad's product range, the species addressed (poultry, swine, aquaculture, dairy and cattle), and its customers are highly complementary to Adisseo's and will allow the combined business to implement integrated solutions and offer even more value to customers.

A joint Adisseo/Nutriad project group has been set up and is already working on identifying and implementing the synergies.
Published in News
More than ever, Canadians are talking about what’s on their plate and how it gets there. That being the case, the rally cries for producers to speak up and join these conversations are growing. But why and what does it mean for you if you are so far removed from consumers?
Published in Consumer Issues
Animal Health Australia has received more than 100,000 submissions on draft national poultry guidelines, and cage eggs was one of the most contentious.

The draft Australian animal welfare standards and guidelines for poultry will replace the 15-year-old voluntary regulations. The guidelines cover all aspects of poultry farming but cage eggs are a focus, with about 11 million hens housed in cages in Australia – more than half of all laying hens.

Animal welfare groups such as the RSPCA and Animals Australia want cages phased out and ultimately banned. They say battery cages are cruel and severely restrict movement, leading to bone and muscle weakness, and distress.

But the chief executive of Egg Farmers of Australia, John Dunn, said the “radical suggestion” of a ban or phase-out of cages would lead to massive loss of production and increase the price of eggs. He said 56 per cent of egg production in Australia involved cages and the industry “can’t just turn that off”. For the full story, click here.
Published in News
A Japanese scientist and his team have cracked open a method to improve the production of carbon-free energy—by using proteins taken from egg white.

Yusuke Yamada, a professor at Osaka City University, said his team has managed to use protein from egg white as a "tool" for producing hydrogen, a powerful source of clean electricity. The new method "brings us closer to our ultimate goal of producing hydrogen from water," Yamada told AFP.

When it reacts with oxygen, hydrogen produces electricity, releasing only water and heat in the process. But hydrogen is currently mass-produced using natural gas or fossil fuels, which themselves result in harmful emissions. It can be produced in labs without fossil fuels and scientists have traditionally done this by creating a special interaction of the molecules in liquid, explained Yamada. For the full story, click here.
Published in News
Turkey Farmers of Canada (TFC) is deeply troubled and concerned about the signing of the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP).

“We believe this deal will harm the turkey sector,” said TFC chair Mark Davies. “There was no need to maintain the market access levels of the original TPP, which were made in response to demands by the U.S., which is no longer part of the agreement.”

After the U.S. pulled out from the original Trans-Pacific Partnership, the remaining 11 member countries agreed on January 23, 2018 to a revised trade agreement in principle. The agreement is scheduled to officially be signed in early March 2018.

This deal will increase import access to the Canadian turkey market by 71 per cent, representing $270 million in lost farm cash receipts over the next 19 years, and a farm output loss of at least 4.5 per cent.

“Farmers’ livelihoods will be impacted by corresponding farm income losses, without even taking into account downward pressure on farm prices or the market growth Canadian farmers will lose to exporters,” said Davies. “Total economic activity losses in the order of $111 million per year will occur throughout the value-chain.”

“We will be losing family farms, at a time when 90 per cent of Canadians want turkey produced in Canada according to a 2017 survey,” Davies noted. “The original TPP agreement came with commitments to mitigation and remedies for border irritants. We look forward to working with the government to follow through on these commitments and work on solutions tailored to our sector.”
Published in Trade
A highly contagious strain of bird flu (H5N6) has been reported at chicken farms near Seoul. In a recent statement, the South Korean Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs said it confirmed a "highly pathogenic strain of H5N6 avian influenza" on a chicken farm in Pyeongtaek in Gyeonggi Province.

According to the ministry, there have been 16 cases of avian influenza confirmed on poultry farms and 10 in wild birds.

Fears of the virus spreading in the week just before the Winter Olympic Games begin have prompted the government to quarantine farms where the virus is present and led to further plans to inspect nearby farms. For the full story, CLICK HERE.
Published in News
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