Global
For the first time, HatchCare chicks have been born in the United Kingdom. Specifically, these first chicks were hatched on July 16 in Boston, Lincolnshire, U.K., and were directly provided with feed, water and light post-hatch.

HatchTech commissioned the HatchCare hatchery together with Annyalla Chicks, a family business that runs independent hatcheries in Ireland and the U.K.

Following the positive results of several field trips to HatchCare hatcheries and farms, equipping this hatchery with HatchCare was selected for Annyalla Chicks.

John Mawer, CEO of Annyalla Chicks says, “The evidence I’ve seen shows improvement in many areas, including enhanced hatching results, superior technical performance at broiler level and reduced medication requirements. Above all, the biggest attraction for us is the much-improved welfare it brings to our chicks.”

The hatchery will produce 500,000 day-old chicks in the first phase, with the possibility of extending this to 2.2 million day-old chicks within the existing building. HatchTech delivered the whole package of incubation solutions – from setters and HatchCare units to heating, cooling and ventilation equipment.

“We’re very pleased with this successful startup and the entrance of HatchCare chicks into the UK market. We’re proud to be able to provide Annyalla Chicks with all the benefits of early feeding, such as improved welfare conditions, undisrupted development of the birds and better technical performance at broiler farm level. We’re really looking forward to a successful rollout,” says Michiel van Veldhuisen, international sales manager with HatchTech.

Besides building a HatchCare hatchery, Annyalla Chicks also commissioned a HatchTraveller. This enables the chicks to eat during transportation, which will enhance chick quality and positively contribute to their development. The HatchTraveller will be supplied in September.
Published in Company News
A team of investigators have isolated colistin-resistant Escherichia coli from a commercial poultry farm in China. Colistin is an antibiotic of last resort against certain bacteria. The research is published in the journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.

In the study, as part of ongoing surveillance, the researchers from Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan University collected rectal swabs from randomly selected chickens in multiple commercial chicken farms in China.

The researchers found that E. coli from the chickens often carried multiple resistance genes, including one copy of the colistin-resistance gene mcr-1, and one copy of the resistance gene, mcr-3. This is the first report of these two genes on a single plasmid. | READ MORE
Published in News
A chicken farmer has been given a suspended jail sentence for falsely claiming that eggs produced in crowded henhouses were free-range.

Eggs from James Gigg’s farm in Dorset were sold to shops and delicatessens that marketed them to customers as free-range. He was sentenced to 12 months in jail but suspended it for 18 months because he accepted the farmer had not acted out of greed. | READ MORE
Published in News
Phagelux, Inc. a global biotechnology company focused on the development and commercialization of novel phage and lysin antibacterial products and solutions, made multiple announcements by entities within its agricultural division.

Tyler Homer, director of U.S. Operations for OmniLytics, a wholly owned subsidary of Phagelux, Inc., announced that OmniLytics has entered into a product development collaboration with NutriQuest to co-develop phage-based feed additive products.

Homer stated, "We are delighted to be working with one of the most innovative and fastest growing feed additive companies to create some truly unique and valuable new products."

Steve Weiss, president for NutriQuest added, "This partnership couples the OmniLytics leadership position in creating phage-based solutions with our expertise in the feed additives business to create what we believe will be very important new solutions for poultry and livestock producers. Producers are losing access to valuable tools in poultry and livestock production that are resulting in increased costs and we believe the solutions we create together will fill those critical needs and provide a high level of value."

Phagelux, Inc. has significant agricultural research, development and manufacturing capabilities in China.

William Wang, COO of Phagelux in China noted that Phagelux has added eleven new distributors to the Phagelux AgriHealth distribution network since January 1, 2018.

Wang noted that, "Although the line of our animal health products is still limited, and although we are just starting our sales efforts, the market seems to be responding positively to our products. In many agricultural categories treatments based on traditional antibiotics are either failing, or the public is demanding growers use less, and our products provide safe and natural alternatives that are often even more effective than traditional chemical antibiotics."
Published in News
DATE: June 14, 2018

LOCATION: Village of Donchevo [Dobrich]

DETAILS: An outbreak of a virulent bird flu virus has spread to another farm in northeastern Bulgaria, the national food safety agency reported on June 13, 2018.

A three-kilometer protection zone was set around the farm in the village of Donchevo [Dobrich] and the sale of eggs and the movement of domestic, wild, and other birds was banned within it, the agency said in a statement.

Two weeks ago, the agency authorities reported an outbreak of the virus on a duck farm in the village of Stefanovo [Dobrich] and said birds on the farm were being culled.

Bulgaria has reported a handful of outbreaks in the past year, some involving the highly pathogenic H5N8 bird flu virus.

SOURCE:
http://www.promedmail.org/post/5856014

ProMED-mail post
http://www.promedmail.org/

ProMED-mail is a program of the International Society for Infectious Diseases
http://www.isid.org

Published in Disease watch
Chicken farmers in the Philippines will soon test their birds for deadly pathogens with a new hand-held device and smartphone app they can use on their own farms.

It will help farmers act fast before disease can spread and potentially infect people. It also cuts out the need to send samples away for expensive lab tests.

A team of scientists lead by Brunel University London will develop a molecular test and a smartphone app that, when used together, detect six key pathogens in poultry.

Farmers will collect samples from their birds using a large-matchbox-sized instrument that screens the DNA and RNA. The device connects wirelessly to the app to display the results, which can can also feed into a central store to help track outbreaks across the islands. The whole process takes less than an hour. | For the full story, CLICK HERE
Published in News
DATE: June 7, 2018

LOCATION: Liaozhong district, Shenyang, Liaoning

DETAILS: On May 22, a new stain of a listed disease was confirmed on a farm in the Liaozahong district. Control measures are underway. Event status is continuing to be updated.

SOURCE:
http://www.promedmail.org/post/5844854

ProMED-mail post
http://www.promedmail.org/

ProMED-mail is a program of the International Society for Infectious Diseases
http://www.isid.org

Published in Disease watch
Sustainability is not a buzzword in farming. It’s a day-to-day reality. If you don’t sustain the soil and greater environment on a farm, you won’t have a future. And if you don’t efficiently use – and maybe re-use – energy, water and other resources, you won’t sustain your farm business financially either, again jeopardizing your future.
Published in Layers
The British poultry industry has today launched a new apprenticeship standard for poultry workers, creating a pipeline to bring skilled workers into the sector.

A cross-industry group, which includes the NFU, British Poultry Council (BPC) and Poultec, has launched the new initiative at the Pig and Poultry Fair.

It is a significant investment from the poultry sector in its workforce, and strengthens the existing Poultry Passport.

The apprenticeship places a greater emphasis on all-round development, which could include a work-based diploma and assessments which consider the skills, knowledge and behaviours needed for an apprentice to be properly trained. | READ MORE
Published in News
Dan Lenihan, who introduced the Cobb breed of chickens to Ireland and contributed to its success across the UK and Europe, has died at age 79.

In the 1970s Cobb was one of the U.S. broiler breeds that transformed chicken from luxury to an everyday meal and Dan Lenihan saw this potential when he bought the assets of Cobb Ireland in 1974. This company had been established in the early 1960s to serve the Irish market at a time when there were severe animal health restrictions on imports of poultry.

Cobb Ireland built the hatchery at Straffan, near Dublin, and after purchasing the business Dan Lenihan bought another hatchery at Mullingar, County Westmeath to expand production. This increased from less than 100,000 to more than two million parent stock chicks a year by 2000, delivering throughout Ireland and the UK.

Cobb Ireland began exporting breeding stock to Taiwan and Syria in 1975 and as the Cobb breed has expanded across Europe, Middle East and Africa through the last 40 years, the company has played a significant role in this growth.

During the last 20 years Dan Lenihan’s operation in Ireland has transitioned from a distributor to a contract producer for Cobb Europe.

Ireland's unrivalled history in terms of notifiable diseases has played a key role in Cobb being able to protect supply to customers during the avian influenza issues that occur from time to time in Western Europe. The farms hold a combination of great grandparent and grandparent stock.

“Dan has been a true ambassador for Cobb over the last 40 years,” said Mark Sams, general manager for Cobb Europe. “He was a trusted and respected partner who built up relationships within the industry from the U.S., Africa and as far as Australia. He will be deeply missed by us all.”

Dan Lenihan was born in Newcastle West, County Limerick, and initially studied dairy science at Cork University. After working in a hatchery in Kill, County Kildare, he set up his own poultry business in Newcastle West with the initial Irish franchise for the Warren Brown egg layer and later sold this business to Whittaker's Hatchery in Cork.

He is a former chairman of Bord Glad, the Irish Food Board, and also served as chairman of the Respect fund raising charity that helps people with an intellectual disability. He has also been chairman of the National Poultry Council in Ireland and of the Irish Chick Hatcheries Association.

He is survived by wife Marian, son Daniel and daughter Caroline.
Published in Producers
A new genetic link to the immune system in laying hens has been discovered that could result in laying hens being born resistant to many diseases.

Pioneering research of the full genome of over 1,600 layers has revealed a genetic link to natural antibodies (called: NAbs).

This research that was undertaken by Wageningen University in the Netherlands and Hendrix Genetics. It has huge potential to impact productivity, biosecurity, and sustainability. | READ MORE
Published in News
The results of a study recently published in the prestigious international journal Science Advances have enabled researchers to better understand the role of eggshells in embryo development and hatching.

The objective of the study, conducted by an international research team led by Marc McKee from McGill University in Canada and involving the participation of scientists from the University of Granada (UGR), was to analyse the nanostructure of chicken eggshells.

The findings could be used to produce healthier, more robust eggs by providing researchers with the means to genetically select laying hens with specific characteristics.

An eggshell is made up of both organic and inorganic matter that contains calcium carbonate. One of the important findings of the study was that the nanostructure was closely linked to the presence of osteopontin, a protein which is also found in bones.

Eggshell transformation process
Eggshells are strong enough to resist fractures during the incubation period. However, they gradually weaken as the hatching period approaches to make it easier for the chicks to break through the shell.

The eggshell weakens as its internal layer dissolves, releasing calcium which, in turn, is needed by the embryo for bone formation.

The study found that this process is made possible as a result of the changes that occur in the eggshell nanostructure during the incubation period.

Implications for food safety
Furthermore, the researchers were able to recreate similar nanostructures to those they discovered in the eggshells by using proteins, specifically by adding osteopontin to mineral crystals grown in the lab.

The team add that: “A better understanding of the role of proteins in the calcification process that strengthens the eggshell structure could have significant implications for food safety.”

According to the team, which includes Alejandro B. Rodríguez Navarro from the Department of Mineralogy and Petrology (UGR), approximately 10 per cent of all eggs break or crack before consumption, which increases the risk of food poisoning and infections such as Salmonella.

Understanding how the different mineral nanostructures contribute to strengthening the eggshell could allow scientists to genetically select laying hens based on specific traits, which would put healthier, more resistant eggs into circulation.

However, studying the internal structure of eggshells can be challenging because of the ease with which they break when under analysis. To overcome this obstacle, the team used a focused ion beam sectioning system that allowed them to accurately cut the samples out of the eggshells and study them using electron microscopy.

The full pager is avaliable here: https://canal.ugr.es/noticia/study-healthier-robust-eggs/
Published in Health
New specialty market approval, scientific forum discussion and broadened adoption are all rapidly taking shape for the Nuscience elite level feed technology platform in Canada, available under the Biotica product brand via strategic marketing partnership with Canadian Bio-Systems Inc. (CBS Inc.).

The advances come as Nuscience, a member of the Royal Agrifirm Group, launches the next phase of its Biotica introduction for the Canadian market, providing the feed industry including poultry, swine and ruminant sectors with fresh solutions designed to fit with the paradigm shift toward reduced antimicrobial use.

Versatility for specialty and conventional markets
Nuscience and CBS Inc. recently received authorization for Biotica as approved for use in Canadian organic production, further adding to the specialty market versatility of the platform, which is designed for use across conventional and a range of specialty production approaches.

“We are seeing strong initial uptake of Biotica by progressive companies and producers looking to prepare for the new standards on judicious use of antibiotics and also to align production strategies with a range of both current and emerging market opportunities,” says Rob Patterson, technical director with CBS Inc.

“There is a lot of rising interest to learn more about this new solution at a time of rapid industry evolution. We look forward to furthering this discussion with our animal nutrition colleagues at the upcoming science and technical forums.”

Lessons from Europe benefit North America
Biotica is a functional feed additive that fits well with advanced strategies designed to support health, well-being and overall performance of animals.

The Nuscience technology featured in Biotica has become a market leader globally with a proven decade-plus track record of use with production systems designed to optimize animal and production benefits without the inclusion of antibiotic growth promoters.

“In Europe we have gone through the transitions now underway in Canada, the U.S. and other jurisdictions,” says Rob Goedegebuure, global lead, Health4U Feed Additives, Nuscience. “These transitions have driven our scientific focus and shaped the evolution of our feed technology solutions that are widely used in Europe and growing rapidly in adoption elsewhere. This includes our latest generation elite level feed technology suite featured in Biotica.”

Canada has set December 2018 as the deadline for moving all use of antibiotics to prescription only.

Major producer and commodity associations have implemented various stages of programs aligned with this shift, often addressing antimicrobial stewardship along with broader sustainability initiatives encompassing additional aspects of production such as housing, biosecurity, environment, welfare, quality and food safety.

Healthy animals, healthy production
Goedegebuure has been part of several recent Nuscience delegations that have toured key production regions in Canada and participated in numerous meetings and industry events along with CBS Inc. team partners.

“We have enjoyed meeting with Canadian colleagues and have been encouraged with the increasingly progressive focus we have seen on embracing innovation and science-based solutions. With today’s knowledge, tools and strategies, there is excellent potential for production systems that raise the bar on performance and profitability while also ensuring high standards of animal care and welfare.”

Nuscience approaches the animal feed industry with two focused business units, Nutrition4U and Health4U.

Nutrition4U by Nuscience is a range of young animal nutrition concepts, customized premixes and performing concentrates. Health4U by Nuscience, which includes the technology featured in Biotica, offers innovative additives and functional feed ingredients.

Royal Agrifirm Group, headquartered in the Netherlands, is a leading agricultural cooperative with an international network of subsidiaries in 16 countries within Europe, South America and Asia and a worldwide distribution network.

CBS Inc., based in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, is an innovation-focused company with global reach that researches, develops and manufactures a wide range of bio-based products used in feed, food and industrial applications. It is a pioneer and leader in enzymes and other bio-based feed technology options, leveraging over 30 years of research and development. Producers and industry can contact their CBS Inc. sales representative for more details on Biotica and CBS Inc. Feed Science Platforms. More information is also available at www.canadianbio.com.
Published in News
As it did for most livestock species, substantial genetic improvement in turkeys started in the 21st century. In the 1960s, hybridization of turkey varieties began, followed by the development of pedigree programs for large white turkeys in the 1970s.
Published in Genetics
Five genes that affect sociality-related behaviour in chickens have been identified by researchers at Linköping University in Sweden.

Several of the genes have been previously linked to nervous system function or behaviour. The new study, which is published in Genetics, is the first that assigns these genes a role in sociality.

Sociality and social behaviour covers a wide range of behaviours. Dogs seeking human contact and honeybees using complex waggle dances to exchange information on where to find good food sources are two examples from the animal world. But what actually governs social behaviour?

“By identifying the genes responsible for the variation in such sociality we can understand how sociality is formed and how social behaviour is controlled at a genetic level. Why some people or animals are more gregarious by nature and others more independent is just one such example,” says Dominic Wright, senior lecturer at the Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), who has led the study.

To assess this, the researchers used a cross between wild and domestic chickens. The AVIAN research group at Linköping University is one of the few groups in the world with a breeding population of Red Junglefowl, the wild ancestor of the domestic fowl.

For 8,000 years, humans have selected the individuals that have desirable traits and bred them, a process known as domestication. As a result, today’s domestic fowl and the original wild fowl differ strongly in their social behaviour. For example, Red Junglefowl typically take longer to approach other birds, but spend more time with them when they do.

By crossing the domestic and the wild fowl for several generations, the researchers obtained chickens that exhibited a large range of social behaviour.

The researchers measured sociality by placing chickens in a novel environment (a large box) and observing how likely they were to seek contact with other chickens. A more social chicken approaches the others more rapidly and spends less time exploring the new surroundings. The same behaviour is also displayed by more anxious chickens.

The investigators also measured gene expression in one of several regions in the brain involved in the regulation of social behaviour, the hypothalamus. By correlating behaviour, gene expression and genetic variants, the researchers identified five genes that seem to control aspects of this behaviour.

“Although these genes had been implicated with behaviour or nervous system function previously, this is the first time they have been shown to control sociality also. We also found that several of the genes affect both sociality and anxiety in the chickens,” says Dominic Wright.

The research was supported by grants from the Carl Trygger Stiftelse, the Swedish Research Council, the Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning (FORMAS) and the European Research Council.
Published in Genetics
Multinational feed additives producer Nutriad participated in the 11th Asia Pacific Poultry Congress (APPC) organized by the World Poultry Science Association, which was held in Bangkok recently.

Belgium-headquartered Nutriad works with poultry producers around the world to support them with feed additives solutions that have effectively proven to promote gut health, even in an environment where the use of antibiotics is increasingly being restricted.

In recent years 'Gut health' has been gaining an increasing attention from veterinarians. It is understood that it refers to multiple positive aspects of the gastrointestinal tract, such as the effective digestion by absorption of food, absence of GI illness, normal and stable intestinal microbiota, effective immune status and a state of well-being.

Any disturbance or imbalance in these matters could potentially impact the gut health of animals. It is therefore necessary to maintain the balance of all possible associated factors related to gut health.

Poultry producers used to achieve this by using of Antibiotic Growth Promoters (AGPs). The use of AGPs however is being increasingly restricted. That resulted in the development of natural additives that became part of alternative feed strategies.

Nutriad has been pioneering research and product development that support producers around the world in achieving gut health and notices an increasing attention in Asia Pacific for its’ innovative solutions.

At the APPC, business development manager of digestive performance Daniel Ramirez presented on “Utilizing Feed Additives to Maximize Broiler Gut Health,” where he emphasized on the improvements that can be made by optimizing single-molecule feed additives and by investigating their optimal use in specific programs, focusing on the application of butyrate (ADIMIX Precision) and phytogenic compounds (APEX 5).

“Gut health is important for maximizing the health, welfare, and performance of poultry. For optimum intestinal support, ADIMIX Precision utilizes a unique precision delivery matrix that delivers the butyrate into the intestines where it has the greatest benefit,” Ramirez said.

For more information, visit: www.nutriad.com.
Published in Broilers
USPOULTRY and the USPOULTRY Foundation announce the completion of a funded research project at the University of Delaware in Newark, Del., in which researchers found that European infectious bronchitis vaccine does not protect against U.S. strains.

The research is part of the Association’s comprehensive research program encompassing all phases of poultry and egg production and processing.

Dr. Jack Gelb and colleagues recently completed a research project in which they examined the use of multiple strains of infectious bronchitis vaccines to induce protection against new infectious bronchitis variants.

They found that combinations of existing vaccines did not provide protection to the new strains. Inclusion of the European 4/91 vaccine also failed to provide significant protection against current variant strains of infectious bronchitis.

A complete report may be obtained by going to USPOULTRY’s website, www.uspoultry.org.
Published in Health
The Miamys Poultry Company from Tunis, Tunisia will be purchasing Jamesway multi-stage machines for their upcoming hatchery project.

The contract was signed, with some ceremony, at the Canadian Embassy in Tunisia with Canadian Trade Commissioner, Philippe Armengau, in attendance. Jamesway is proud to be adding another country to their list of over 180 international clients.

The large Tunisian company has been involved with breeder, turkey and layer production and will be expanding with this new hatchery.

The decision to use Jamesway was solidified after a successful visit to Poland where the Miamys Team was able to tour the Cedrob Hatchery, the largest hatchery in the world and an enthusiastic Jamesway client.

Along with a complete line of setters and hatchers, the Tunisian operation will also feature some of Jamesway’s Automatic Hatchery equipment and Hatchcom Data Retrieval System.
Published in Companies
A team of Spanish scientists report the environmental cost of egg production in a typical farm in Spain.

Egg production has increased in recent decades, and has reached a volume of 68 million tons worldwide. The main reason is that chicken eggs are not only a valuable source of protein, but also inexpensive.

Currently, about 7 million tons of eggs are produced each year in the European Union. Spain is one of the largest producers with 1,260 farms and an average of 67,700 chickens each. | READ MORE
Published in News
Noble Foods - the U.K.'s largest egg producer which currently has around 4.3 million hens in cages - has announced its commitment to moving to solely cage-free egg production by 2025.

The announcement follows a six-month long campaign by The Humane League U.K., launched in October last year. More than 68,000 people signed a petition calling on Noble Foods to go cage-free. | For the full story, CLICK HERE.
Published in News
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