Livestock Production
Dalaine Farm
Sector - Broilers
Location - Shakespeare, Ont.
Published in Companies
The recently updated Canadian code of practice for the care and handling of broilers includes new requirements regarding lighting. The code takes into consideration expertise from a committee of researchers and specialists, and also considers several studies out the University of Saskatchewan, conducted by poultry researchers Karen Schwean-Lardner and Henry Classen in collaboration with Aviagen. Schwean-Lardner presented her findings at a recent Poultry Industry Council broiler meeting.
Published in Broilers
With the use of antibiotics for growth and performance promotion phased out in Canadian poultry production, boosting support for overall health is critical. Indeed, overall health is closely related to gut health in chickens and turkeys – the better the gut health, the better the chances of avoiding necrotic enteritis and other diseases that can lead to poor performance and mortality.
Published in Nutrition and Feed
Nesting behaviour in laying hens is complex, and according to poultry scientists such as Dr. Michelle Hunniford of the department of animal biosciences at the University of Guelph in Ontario, there’s a lot left to discover.
Published in Layers
The Canadian Agricultural Partnership (CAP) is a five-year federal-provincial-territorial initiative that assists government, industry and other partners to work together to advance Ontario’s agri-food and agri-products sectors, and focus on achieving key outcomes related to economic development, environmental stewardship and protection and assurance.

CAP will build on the successes of Growing Forward 2 (GF2) to create further economic growth for Ontario’s agri-food and agri-products sectors.

Cost-Share funding assistance for organizations and collaborations

All cost-share funding assistance is merit-based, and project funding amounts are individually established based on the new and updated project categories. Cost-share funding will support targeted projects in three priority areas, with research and innovation continuing to be important across all programming:
  • Economic Development in the agri-food and agri-products sectors
  • Environmental Stewardship to enhance water quality and soil health
  • Protection and Assurance to reinforce the foundation for public trust in the sector through improved assurance systems in food safety and plant and animal health
In order to obtain merit-based cost-share funding assistance for organizations and collaborations under CAP, you must be an eligible applicant, and you must submit an eligible project meeting the requirements defined for the Project Category.

Merit-based, cost-share funding is available to support projects across CAP’s three priority areas, under 19 different Project Categories, each designed to target specific outcomes. Each Project Category includes eligible activities, eligible expenses, ineligible activities, ineligible expenses, priorities and target audiences for applicants to consider as they develop their projects defined for the Project Category, under which the project is submitted, found in Appendix 1 of the CAP Cost-Share Funding Assistance Program Guide for Organizations and Collaborations.

The first application intake window will open on March 15 and close on April 5, 2018.

For more information, visit: http://adaptcouncil.org/program/cap
Published in News
When it comes to disease diagnostics, time is of the essence. And yet there is currently no commercial, on-farm detection technique for poultry diseases like avian influenza (AI).
Published in Health
There are some types of E. coli (known as avian pathogenic E. coli [APEC]) that can cause serious or fatal colibacillosis infection in chickens. Many factors predispose birds to the infections.
Published in Layers
Ensuring that Canadians have access to safe and healthy food is a top priority for the federal government. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), along with their federal food safety partners, Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada, as well as industry, remind Canadians about the importance of always fully cooking frozen raw breaded poultry products prior to consumption, as well as using proper food handling techniques and following cooking instructions to limit the risk of foodborne illnesses as salmonella is commonly found in raw chicken and frozen raw breaded chicken products.

Extensive efforts have been made by the federal food safety partners and the industry to increase consumer awareness that these products are raw and need to be fully cooked before consumption, as well as significant attempts by the industry to improve labelling and cooking instructions on packages.

Despite these efforts, frozen raw breaded chicken products continue to be identified as a source of salmonella infection in Canada.

As such, the CFIA is working with industry to identify and implement measures at the manufacturing/processing level to reduce salmonella to below a detectable amount in frozen raw breaded chicken products such as chicken nuggets, chicken fingers, chicken strips, popcorn chicken and chicken burgers that are packaged for retail sale. This approach focuses the responsibility on the poultry industry and represents a fundamental change to existing requirements for frozen raw breaded chicken products.

These new measures call for processors to identify salmonella as a hazard and to implement changes in order to produce an end product that reduces salmonella to below a detectable amount. The CFIA has granted industry a 12-month implementation period, to begin immediately, to make these changes.

"The poultry industry's objective is to provide consumers with affordable, safe poultry products, every day. We will continue to work with CFIA to ensure consumers have access to safe frozen raw breaded chicken products," said Robin Horel, president and CEO, Canadian Poultry & Egg Processors Council.

In the last 10 years the incidence of salmonella illness in Canada has steadily increased. This increase has been driven by Salmonella enteritidis (SE), the most common strain of salmonella in the food supply that is often associated with poultry.

While frozen raw breaded chicken products often appear to be "pre-cooked" or "ready-to-eat," these products contain raw chicken and are intended to be handled and prepared the same way as other raw poultry. The safety of these products rests with the consumer who is expected to cook it, according to the directions on the package.

In 2015, industry voluntarily developed additional labelling on frozen raw breaded chicken products that included more prominent and consistent messaging, such as "raw," "uncooked" or "must be cooked" as well as explicit instructions not to microwave the product and they voluntarily introduced adding cooking instructions on the inner-packaging bags.

For more information, visit: http://www.inspection.gc.ca

Published in News
Cobb-Brazil is investing more than one-million dollars in a new fleet of state-of-the-art chick transporters to make sure chicks arrive to customers in top condition. Brazil's large landscape with spread-out farms previously presented a challenge for conventional trailers without specialized climate control.

The first of the new vehicles has already proved its worth in delivering chicks with zero mortality and another six trailers will join the fleet by the end of March. The transporters were designed as part of a joint project with global trailer manufacturer Smithway and Brazil's Facchini, located in São Jose do Rio Preto where Cobb Brazil is headquartered.

The new trailer is equipped with a 100,000 BTU air conditioning system with generators to provide electricity for cooling and heating. The vehicle is designed without corridors so it can hold up to 60,000 chicks - twice the capacity of conventional trailers.

"During their first days chicks need to be kept in constant warmth to ensure good early development," said Lucas Lima, Cobb logistics manager in Brazil. "Conventional trailers depend greatly on the external climate as they are only equipped with humidification, exhaust and ventilation systems. We needed a trailer equipped with independent climate control to ensure the wellbeing and ideal environment for our chicks."

Two fuel-powered generators enable cooling even if the truck's engine is off - an essential feature that allows for periods when the driver is taking a break or, for instance, when the truck is waiting at the airport before loading. The generators operate separately, with the second one only used if the main generator fails.

Internal air quality control is also improved with the new technology. With little air exchange, the chance of harmful organisms circulating inside the trailer is reduced.

"We have been using the new transporter since November and are very pleased with the results," added Lima. "We have been working with near-zero mortality during chick transport as a result of the excellent temperature control and comfort within the trailers. Our goal is that the chicks are delivered to the customer in the same condition they left the hatchery."
Published in News
Archer's Poultry Farm Ltd.
Sector - Layer, hatchery
Location - Trenton, Ont.
Published in Companies
DATE: March 7, 2018

LOCATION: Tongchuan, Wangyi District, Shaanxi, and, Guilin, Lingchuan, Guangxi, China

DETAILS: Information of a reoccurrence of a listed disease received on March 7, 2018 from Dr. Zhang Zhongqui, director general, China Animal Disease Control Centre, Veterinary Bureau, Ministry of Agriculture, Beijing, China (People's Rep of). The outbreak status is continuing (or date resolved not provided).

SOURCE:
http://www.promedmail.org/post/5671741
ProMED-mail post
http://www.promedmail.org/
ProMED-mail is a program of the International Society for Infectious Diseases
http://www.isid.org

Published in Disease watch
DATE: March 5, 2018

LOCATION: Kujanga, Jagatsinghpur, Orissa

DETAILS: Information received of a recurrence of a listed disease on [and dated] March 1, 2018 from Mr Devendra Chaudhry, secretary, Animal Husbandry, Dairying & Fisheries, Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare, New Delhi, India. The outbreak status is continuing (or date resolved not provided).

SOURCE:
http://www.promedmail.org/post/5667511
ProMED-mail post
http://www.promedmail.org/
ProMED-mail is a program of the International Society for Infectious Diseases
http://www.isid.org

Published in Disease watch
The environmental impacts of livestock and poultry production are a challenge for agriculture. Ammonia, along with greenhouse gases like nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide and methane, are key areas of concern.
Published in Turkeys
DATE: March 3, 2018

LOCATION: Slagelse, Zealand, Denmark

DETAILS:
The [Danish] national veterinary institute, DTU Vet, has revealed it has discovered bird flu in a dead white-tailed eagle found near Slagelse in Zealand. According to the Food and Environment Ministry, the bird flu type is most likely H5H6, which is highly deadly to birds. There's no need for the public to be overly alarmed, said the ministry.

For now, the discovery won't lead to more stringent protocol for fowl farmers, but that could change should more contaminated birds be found, such as in late 2016. According to Larsen, it's the 1st instance of bird flu discovered in a wild bird in Denmark since April 2017. And there hasn't been a bird flu case among kept Danish birds since February 2017.

SOURCE:
http://www.promedmail.org/post/5662330
ProMED-mail post
http://www.promedmail.org/
ProMED-mail is a program of the International Society for Infectious Diseases
http://www.isid.org
Published in Disease watch
The updated National Farm Animal Care Council code of practice for laying hens contains many specifications for foraging, perches and nests – enrichments that allow the hens to engage in natural behaviours. These enhancements vary to some degree among housing providers. Here’s what some of them offer and why.
Published in Layers
Researchers at The Pirbright Institute have created a new method of genetically modifying the Marek’s disease vaccine so that it is able to protect against another destructive poultry virus called infectious bursal disease (IBD), and potentially others such as avian influenza and Newcastle disease. This approach could lead to a reduction in the number of vaccines that need to be administered to each bird.

For the first time, Pirbright scientists have been able to use a gene editing system called CRISPR/cas9 to add a gene of the IBD virus into a current Marek’s disease vaccine virus. The added genetic material protects poultry against IBD in addition to the protection already offered by the Marek’s disease vaccine, meaning that bird owners would only need to use one vaccine instead of two. For the full story, click here.
Published in News
As it marks its 75th year in business, family-owned and operated Sargent Farms is investing $10 million to enhance and retrofit its halal chicken processing facility in Milton.

The upgrade project, scheduled to begin this spring, will ensure the third-generation business will continue to deliver the highest quality, fresh products to a growing base of loyal customers in the retail, food service and restaurant sectors for decades to come.

“Milton has been an important part of our history and our home base for three quarters of a century,” says Bob Sargent, Vice President of Sargent Farms. “We’re committed to making the investments needed to continue growing our operation, provide our customers the best possible products and help make our community a great place to live and work.”

The footprint of Sargent Farms’ processing plant in Milton’s downtown core will remain the same, but all processing equipment inside the facility will be replaced with the latest, state-of-the-art technology. The retrofit will be carried out in stages over three years, primarily during off hours, allowing the plant to continue operating throughout the project.

Sargent Farms, which produces 100% Halal chicken processed by hand, has experienced significant growth over the past decade, driven in part by two retail stores it recently opened in Milton and Mississauga.

The new processing equipment will increase the plant’s efficiency, allowing it to satisfy growing consumer demand by processing more chicken in a shorter amount of time. Greater efficiency will also contribute to the processing plant’s overall profitability, increasing stability for its workforce of almost 300 employees.

Among other benefits, the project will help Sargent Farms continue to enhance its animal care standards and diversify its line of top-quality, local chicken products.

This latest upgrade for the Milton plant follows an investment of approximately $4 million in 2014.

“It’s important to us to continue to build on our long-standing reputation as a progressive and innovative processor. The investments we’ve made in recent years and will continue to make in this project will help us make good on that commitment,” says Kevin Thompson, CEO of Sargent Farms.

In addition to its Milton headquarters and processing operation, Sargent Farms also operates a further processing facility in Mississauga.
Published in News
In a new initiative, the College of Veterinarians of Ontario (CVO) is launching a new public advisory panel.

The College is currently seeking applications from members of the non-veterinary public to fill 10 positions on a panel. CVO says this is an opportunity for those who own animals or are involved in the animal sector, to contribute to the development of veterinary policy and support the College's mandate in serving the public interest in Ontario.

For more information, visit: http://cvo.informz.ca/z/cjUucD9taT05MjY0MzEmcD0xJnU9OTIwODc2MDkxJmxpPTEwMDY4NzIz/index.html

Published in News
Third generation poultry farmer Don Sundgaard says when it comes to succession, be patient, encourage off-farm experiences and welcome both formal and informal discussions.
Published in Producers
Footpad dermatitis (FPD) in broiler chickens is characterized by ulcerated lesions on the underside of the foot, and is associated with poor litter conditions – typically characterized by high moisture and ammonia levels. Broiler FPD presents itself within the first two weeks of age and increases in severity as bird body weight and footpad (FP) contact with litter increases.
Published in Broilers
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