Production
June 23, 2017, Indiana - The cage-free revolution has been driven by consumers, many of whom think the change is better for chickens (though many also may believe eggs from uncaged hens are better quality).

Animal protection groups argue it definitely is: Birds that are not confined to small wire cages can at least spread their wings and engage in natural behaviors like dust-bathing and perching, even if they never see the light of day.

But egg producers and researchers caution that the switch is not as simple as just opening those cage doors — and that mobility brings with it a new set of concerns for chickens’ welfare that most farmers have never confronted.

A major 2015 study of three different hen-housing systems found that mortality was highest among birds in cage-free aviaries and that they also had more keel bone problems. READ MORE 
Published in Eggs - Layers
June 16, 2017, Montreal, QC - Compensating farmers who paid for production quotas with the revenue from a temporary tax would allow the government to abolish supply management in the dairy, poultry, and egg sectors, shows a Viewpoint published by the Montreal Economic Institute (MEI).

Such a measure would be positive both for farmers and for Canadian consumers. "If the government decided to compensate farmers for the value of their quotas over a period of ten years, it would have to offer them annual payments of $1.6 billion. Yet the net benefit for consumers would be from $3.9 billion to $5.1 billion each year, and up to $6.7 billion once the reimbursement period is over," explains Alexandre Moreau, Public Policy Analyst at the MEI and co-author of the publication.

For example, Canadians could pay $2.31 for a two-litre carton of milk following liberalization, instead of the current price of $4.93, he adds.

The accounting value of the quotas, estimated at $13 billion by the MEI, is on average equal to 38% of their current market value, which comes to a little over $34 billion.

Compensation would vary from one farmer to another in order to avoid providing excessive compensation to farmers who bought their quotas at a fraction of the current price, or received them free of charge, while being fair to those who acquired quotas recently at a higher cost.

If Ottawa decided to liberalize supply-managed sectors, a temporary tax should serve to finance the compensation paid to farmers. This tax would disappear once the compensation was paid in full.

"Such a policy was used successfully in Australia when that country eliminated its own supply management system," explains Vincent Geloso, Associate Researcher at the MEI and co-author of the publication. "The compensation offered to producers was financed by a transitory tax equal to half of the expected consumer price decline. Consumers were therefore immediately able to enjoy price reductions while farmers received payments to compensate them for their losses of revenue. The same principle could be applied here," he adds.

Rules regarding the environment, health, and food quality would continue to apply to products imported from abroad once the market is liberalized.

"This exit plan would be positive and fair both for farmers and for consumers. Now, it's up to public decision-makers to take action and dismantle this regime that is unfair and costly for consumers, all while adequately compensating farmers," concludes Alexandre Moreau.

The Viewpoint entitled "Ending Supply Management with a Quota Buyback" was prepared by Alexandre Moreau, Public Policy Analyst at the MEI, and Vincent Geloso, Associate Researcher at the MEI. 
Published in Farm Business
June 16, Elmhurst, Ont. - Ongoing research at the University of Saskatchewan is examining how light cycles can affect a bird’s natural rhythm, health and growth rate.

“Turning the lights off can have a dramatic effect on how birds move around in their environment,” Dr. Karen Schwean-Lardner, assistant professor in the department of animal and poultry science at the University of Saskatchewan, said.

Schwean-Lardner recently discussed her research study at New-Life MillsTurkey Producers Academy held in Elmhurst, Ont., on June 1. The research project initially examined how light cycles affect broilers and is now performing the same research study on turkeys.

“It is really important that we look at turkey data for turkey producers, not just take assumptions from broiler data,” Schwean-Lardner said.

Research results are suggesting the ideal amount of light per 24 hours for turkeys to be 14 to 17 hours. It is also noted it is ideal to establish distinct day and night times and to implement increases and decreases gradually.

“If flocks have mortality issues, periods of darkness can certainly help that. If you are considering making a change to your lighting program be sure to do make your adjustments in the evening, before the period of darkness, to avoid interrupting the bird’s feeding cycle,” Schwean-Lardner said.

The New-Life Mills event also featured William Alexander, technical representative from Hybrid Turkeys. Alexander discussed factors that contribute to consistent quality poult starts and Lisa Hodgins, monogastric nutritionist from New-Life Mills, spoke on the evolution of feeding programs.
Published in Bird Management
June 15, 2017, Austin TX - Global Animal Partnership (GAP), creator of North America’s most comprehensive farm animal welfare standards, has provided a grant-in-aid of research to the University of Guelph, Ontario for a two-year research project that will determine and evaluate the parameters necessary for assessing the animal welfare needs of different genetic strains of chicken breeds.

In 2016, GAP announced its intention to replace 100 percent of chicken breeds that result in poor welfare outcomes by 2024 with breeds meeting specified welfare outcomes within its 5-Step®Rating Program.

The Guelph research project will help determine which genetic strains are best suited for commercial production under the new standards GAP is creating. GAP will provide public updates throughout the duration of the project.

University of Guelph researchers Dr. Tina Widowski and Dr. Stephanie Torrey are leading the project. They will begin by running pilot studies over the summer, and the formal research study is due to begin this fall (Fall 2017), and will take approximately two years to complete (Fall 2019). All results will be published upon completion of the study.

“The research team is excited about the scale and scope of this research grant,” said Dr. Widowski. “GAP’s commitment to developing a scientific and robust methodology for assessing chicken breeds will allow us to explore in a comprehensive way, a large number of factors important to both the bird and producers.”

Dr. Widowski, a researcher and faculty member in the Department of Animal Biosciences, is the University Chair in Animal Welfare and director of the internationally recognized Campbell Centre for the Study of Animal Welfare (CCSAW), which has a reputation of hosting the largest animal welfare graduate program in North America. She is also the research chair of Poultry Welfare for the Egg Farmers of Canada.

Dr. Torrey is a senior research scientist in Applied Animal Behavior and Welfare, with an expertise in applied animal welfare. Her team of graduate and undergraduate students focuses on fundamental and applied research with broiler and broiler breeder chickens and turkeys.

Currently, fast-growing chicken breeds resulting in poor welfare outcomes represent 98 percent of all commercially available chicken meat in North America.

Modern chickens have been genetically selected for their fast, efficient growth and higher yield of breast meat. However, this has had detrimental impacts on the welfare of broiler chickens, including immune and musculoskeletal problems, resulting in limitations to the birds’ ability to express natural behaviors like perching, flying, and even walking.

This study will help create a way to objectively evaluate different genetic strains using a comprehensive list of parameters related to behavior, growth, health and production with the end goal of improving chicken welfare and specifically address the many issues resulting from fast-growing breeds.

More than 600 chicken farms currently use the GAP standard, affecting the lives of 277 million chickens annually and making it the most significant higher welfare farm animal standard in the country. Retailers, foodservice companies and restaurants have committed to adopting GAP’s new chicken standard and moving away from breeds of chickens that result in poor welfare outcomes by 2024, including Whole Foods Market, Compass Group, Quiznos, and Boston Market.

The Global Animal Partnership is a global leader in farm animal welfare that has established a comprehensive step-by-step program for raising animals that requires audits of every single farm. GAP makes it easy for consumers to find meat products that reflect their values. A nonprofit founded in 2008, GAP brings together farmers, scientists, ranchers, retailers, and animal advocates with the common goal of improving the welfare of animals in agriculture. So far, the 5-Step program includes more than 3,200 farms and ranches that range from Step 1 to Step 5+ and now raise more than 290 million animals annually.
Published in Genetics
June 9, 2017, Canada - For too long, supply management in our dairy, poultry and egg sectors has been seen as a “third rail” in Canadian politics, an untouchable sacred cow. No longer.

The evidence for reform is staggering. Research and analysis conducted by a variety of experts across Canada have overwhelmingly demonstrated the inequity and inefficiency of the current system.

Increasingly persuasive commentary is coming from all sides. And despite the propaganda made possible by the wealth and power of the dairy lobby, more and more politicians are seeing the public opinion tide turning.

It is, after all, a non-partisan issue. Progressives who espouse social justice simply cannot defend the unnecessary costs imposed on consumers – especially low-income families with children in need of affordable essential nutrition – in favour of what is now a small group of millionaire producers. But neither can conservatives defend a regulated cartel which flies in the face of a market-based economy.

And all politicians in Canada, of all stripes, know that Canada’s economy is dependent on trade. We can no longer afford to have supply management harm our leverage in our trade negotiations – particularly given what is now happening with our largest trading partner next door.

It is time for our politicians to do what is right. We are past knowing “why” – now is time for “how.”

How do we transition forward from supply management in a way that is fair to our dairy, poultry and egg producers, as well as to consumers and taxpayers? We know that we can. We have, after all, done this before, most notably with Canada’s wine industry – to great success. And we have other international examples from which to learn – both for what to do and what not to do.

This report proposes just such a plan.

More work is needed to iron out details which will require engagement by all involved. After close to 50 years, the system has become complex.

The same numbers won’t apply to long-time producers as to new entrants, or to producers in different parts of the country. Some producers are ready to retire, or their farms are too small to compete – they would benefit from an appropriate buyout.

For those who want to compete, grow and profit from the incredible international opportunities, additional transition assistance will be needed.

The plan must address both.

The only missing piece now is for our politicians to stand up, defy the power of a wealthy lobby and show the leadership Canadians expect.

A big opportunity has emerged to do something that not only helps in our looming trade negotiations, but that is actually right for Canada.

The future of the dairy industry is bright in Canada. Reforming supply management should not be seen as an obstacle, but rather as an opportunity to redress domestic inequities in a way that is fair to producers, grow our industry, open new markets and, most importantly – compete and win. Because we can.

View PDF report: http://cwf.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/CWF_SupplyManagement_Report_JUNE2017.pdf
Published in Farm Business
June 8, 2017, Abbotsford, B.C. - Tens of thousands of chickens have died in an Abbotsford, B.C., barnfire.

Firefighters were called to the property in the Ross Road area around 1 p.m Tuesday. They arrived to find the two-storey barn fully engulfed by "flames from one end to the other."

Assistant fire chief said there were around 25,000 chickens inside. READ MORE
Published in News
June 8, 2017, Quebec, QB - Extensive planning was required when poultry companies like Pilgrim’s Pride and Tyson Foods announced they were going antibiotic free in their operations.

“Removing antibiotics completely is still a challenge,” said Shivaram Rao of Pilgrims Pride.

It is essential to have treatment options available when early signs of increased deaths are observed, he said at the animal nutrition conference of Canada held in Quebec City May 10 to 11.

In 2013, less than five percent of chicken produced in the United States was antibiotic free but by 2018 about 55 percent is expected to be raised that way, said Rao.

Many companies remove antibiotics from chickens at 35 days of age and have adopted new health practices that start at the hatchery. READ MORE
Published in Health
June 5, 2017, Ottawa, Ont. - The Canadian Poultry and Egg Processors Council (CPEPC) joins with Retail Council of Canada in supporting the Chicken Farmers of Canada Animal Care Program which is based on the National Farm Animal Care Council Code of Practice for Poultry.

Canadian chicken processors uphold very high levels of animal welfare and will continue to do so because it is a critical priority for the industry and because we care. CPEPC chicken processors only purchase chickens from Canadian farmers certified by the Chicken Farmers of Canada (CFC), which represent a single, national high standard of care under the CFC Animal Care Program.

CFC's Animal Care Program is based on the Codes of Practice produced through the very robust National Farm Animal Care Council process.

This process is science based and includes input from farmers, veterinarians, animal welfare groups, government, researchers, customers and processors. The CFC program is mandatory, audited by a third party and regularly revised to reflect best practices.

CPEPC commends the Retail Council and its recent statement of support for this Canadian approach to animal care in the chicken industry, and congratulates CFC on completion of their inaugural comprehensive third party audit by NSF International, an internationally recognized and respected independent certification organization.

The Canadian Poultry and Egg Processors Council (CPEPC) is the national trade organization representing the interests of more than 170 Canadian poultry processing, egg grading and processing and hatchery establishments.

Representing some of the largest agri‐food corporations in Canada, our member companies process over 90% of Canada's chicken, turkey; eggs and hatching eggs. This economic activity generates over $6 billion in retail sales. To accomplish this, our members have invested over $2 billion in plant and equipment, and directly employ more than 21,000 Canadian workers.
Published in Business & Policy
June 5, 2017, Onondaga, Ont. - When they Josh and Melissa Groves learned about a new artisanal chicken program, Josh and Melissa Groves of Vangro Farms Country Market immediately signed up.

It suited to a tee the main theme of their buy local, buy fresh meat production and retail operation.

"We applied as soon as it started last year and we have done well by it," Josh Groves said in an interview at Vangro farm on Highway 54.

He showed freestanding stalls of chicks that are the latest addition to VanGro's lines of fresh lamb cutlets and prepared beef and pork products.

"We're moving into the second year having learned how to make it work for us."

The artisanal chicken program launched by the Chicken Farmers of Ontario in 2016 provides opportunities for small independent farmers to meet local demands for high-quality chicken.

"The Chicken Farmers of Ontario is continually looking to meet the changing needs of Ontario chicken consumers and markets," the organization says on its website.

"The program will help farms fill local food and seasonal markets and will give Ontario consumers more choice and options in how and where they buy locally grown chicken."

The CFO mainly deals with larger operations which must produce to a set quota of tens of thousands of chickens. Its artisanal program is meant to address the more modest needs of local farmers.

Under the program, non-quota holding farmers who wish to grow between 600 and 3,000 chickens each year can partner with independent producers to provide artisanal chicken for select markets. READ MORE
Published in Meat - Broilers
May 31, 2017, Guelph, Ont. - Access the new Food Safety and Traceability eLearning courses online on the Agriculture and Food Education in Ontario online learning system through the University of Guelph, Ridgetown Campus.

The new Traceability eLearning courses show how good practices can:
• Maximize productivity, improve business efficiency, reduce costs and improve business processes
• Be used to increase competitive advantage by accessing new markets
• Improve supply chain management

The new Food Safety eLearning courses will help you to:
• Identify food safety hazards that can occur in your operation
• Understand best practices and develop programs to control these hazards
• Decrease the likelihood of food safety hazards that can lead to a foodborne illness outbreak or product recall

Visit the University of Guelph website to register for a free account. Accessible versions of the courses are available. For more information, contact the University of Guelph, Ridgetown Campus at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or 519-674-1500 ext. 63295.

Online course development was funded through Growing Forward 2, a federal-provincial-territorial initiative that encourages innovation, competitiveness and market development in Canada’s agri-food and agri-products sector.
Published in Production
May 26, 2017, Guelph, Ont. - Today, Parliamentary Secretary for Science, Kate Young, on behalf of the Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, announced $6 million in federal funding for five applied genomics projects, including one geared towards the turkey industry.

The Parliamentary Secretary made the announcement at the University of Guelph, where several of the projects' academic partners are based.

With a total $17 million being invested, including $11 million in funds from the private sector and provincial governments, these projects will have a direct impact on Canada's agriculture, agri-food and health-care sectors.

Four of the projects receiving funding will result in significant competitive advantages to the Canadian dairy, canola, pork and turkey industries, while the fifth project will address the problem of adverse drug reactions in the health-care system.

One of the projects being funded at the University of Guelph is Dr. Peter Pauls' work with Benson Hill Biosystems. His research is exploring ways to significantly enhance crop productivity of canola, an important Canadian crop.

This is a perfect example of the power of genomics research, which is the field of science that studies the full set of genes in an organism and their functions. Dr. Pauls' work will have a direct benefit on the growers, processors and others along the value chain.

These projects are supported through Genome Canada's Genomic Applications Partnership Program (GAPP). GAPP projects translate Canadian knowledge and expertise in genomics into valuable applications that support a strong economy and a growing middle class.
Published in Research
May 26, 2017, San Diego, Cali. - PURE Bioscience, Inc., creator of the patented non-toxic silver dihydrogen citrate antimicrobial, announced that the company has received final acknowledgement from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that its Food Contact Notification (FCN) for use of PURE Control® in raw poultry processing to reduce pathogens became effective last week.

FDA approved PURE Control antimicrobial is applied directly onto raw poultry carcasses, parts and organs as a spray or dip during processing to eliminate pathogens causing foodborne illness, including Salmonella.

PURE is not aware of any equally effective, lower toxicity solution to eliminate Salmonella in poultry processing – and believes PURE Control is the breakthrough solution the poultry industry has been seeking.

SDC is distinguished by the fact that it is both more effective and non-toxic. Currently used poultry processing intervention chemistries, most notably Peracetic acid (or PAA), are highly toxic, irritants to users, negatively impact the environment, are corrosive to equipment, and have a negative yield impact.

The FCN for PURE Control will be added to the list of effective notifications for FCNs, which is available on the FDA website: http://www.fda.gov/Food/IngredientsPackagingLabeling/PackagingFCS/Notifications/default.htm.

As previously announced on April 27, 2017, the FDA had completed its review of the safety and efficacy of the proposed use of SDC in concentrations up to 160 PPM as a raw poultry processing aid, and set an effective date of May 18, 2017.

PURE will be initiating an in-plant raw poultry processing trial in which SDC-based PURE Control will be spray applied to whole chicken carcasses during Online Reprocessing (OLR).

The USDA has already approved PURE Control for use in pre-OLR and post chill poultry processing.
  • This trial is now expected to be completed by early calendar Q3. PURE has just received the necessary scheduling clearances from the plant and the local FSIS inspector.
  • The trial will be conducted following the protocol proposed by PURE and approved by the USDA-FSIS, and will be monitored by FSIS inspection personnel in the plant.
  • Assuming a successful plant trial, and that no additional trials are required by the USDA, PURE anticipates that the USDA-FSIS will issue a “Letter of No Objection” in approximately 4-6 weeks after completion of the trial, stating that PURE Control is approved for use in OLR applications and list SDC as an approved poultry processing aid in Attachment 1 of the FSIS Directive 7120.1 Table 3.
Upon receipt of the “Letter of No Objection,” PURE can immediately commercialize PURE Control for OLR applications and begin to market PURE Control as a superior raw poultry processing aid into the +$350M U.S. market.
Published in Processing
May 17, 2017, Ann Arbor, MI — Global public health organization NSF International has developed an independent certification protocol — Raised Without Antibiotics — to certify animal products have been raised without exposure to antibiotics.

The new certification protocol will help identify products that do not contribute to the growth of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

NSF International’s Raised Without Antibiotics certification can be granted to a wide variety of animal products, including meat, poultry, seafood, dairy, eggs, leather and certain supplement ingredients.

The certification provides independent verification of on-package claims and is the only “raised without antibiotics” certification that covers all animal products.

“A growing number of consumers are concerned about the widespread development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the use of antibiotics in food production,” said Sarah Krol, Global Managing Director of Food Safety Product Certification, NSF International. “NSF International’s Raised Without Antibiotics certification gives consumers an easy way to identify and purchase animal products that have been raised without exposure to antibiotics, which may help alleviate their concerns.”

A 2016 survey conducted for NSF International found that 59 percent of consumers prefer products from animals raised without antibiotics. But, without an independent, transparent protocol and certification process, consumers have not been able to verify claims made by marketers – until now.

Betagro Group in Thailand, a large supplier of chicken to consumers in Asia and Europe, is the first company to earn NSF International’s Raised Without Antibiotics certification.

NSF International developed the Raised Without Antibiotics protocol in partnership with the food animal industry and veterinary stakeholders.

Under the program, animals cannot be certified if they have received antibiotics. The use of ionophore chemical coccidiostats, which are not considered contributors to antimicrobial resistance, may be permitted to prevent infections, depending on labeling regulations in the region of product sale.

The program also encourages preventive measures such as vaccination, alternative treatments, litter management techniques and appropriate stocking density to maintain the health and welfare of the animals.

If sick animals require antibiotics for treatment, they can receive veterinary care but must be removed from the Raised Without Antibiotics program.

Learn more about NSF International’s Raised Without Antibiotics certification.

Register for an informational webinar on Wednesday, June 21, 2017 from 9:30 to 10 a.m. U.S. Pacific Time.
Published in Emerging Trends
May 15, 2017, Alpharetta, GA - The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) recently approved the distribution of Selisseo®, the first pure source of organic selenium capable of meeting nutritional requirements in the Canadian market.

The purity of the proprietary organoselenium-based product, which has been tested in numerous trials, has been shown to consistently deliver more selenium while increasing the availability of selenocysteine (SeCys), thus providing animals with high antioxidant capabilities.

Selenium is an essential nutrient and powerful antioxidant that plays a critical role in metabolism, reproductive health and immunity by fighting oxidative stress.

Organic selenium is more easily integrated into body metabolism than other currently available selenium sources such as inorganic selenium salts and selenium-enriched yeasts.

For more information, visit: http://www.adisseo.com
Published in New Technology
May 12, 2017, Burlington, Ont. - National allocations for A-145 (Aug 6 – Sept 30) and A-146 (Oct 1 – Nov 25) are both set at +5.0% relative to adjusted bases at the Chicken Farmers of Canada (CFC) meeting on May 3, 2017 in Ottawa.

Chicken Farmers of Ontario (CFO) provided its recommendation for national allocation to CFC of +6% above adjusted base for A-145 and A-146. As in prior periods CFO’s recommendation had been framed on a public policy of “balanced best interest” and based on an analysis of the market and an assessment of the demand and supply opportunities as well as potential risks to the market. READ MORE
Published in Farm Business
May 10, 2017, Ottawa, Ont. – Statistics Canada released the 2016 Census of Agriculture today, providing an overview of each agriculture sector in Canada.

The number of farms reporting hens and chickens increased 15.8 per cent from 2011 to 23,910 in 2016. The number of birds rose from 133.0 million to 145.5 million.

According to the Census, one in eight farms, or 12.7 per cent, sell food directly to consumers, with 96.1 per cent of products being unprocessed products, such as eggs and fruit.

Overall, farm profits are unchanged since 2010 and farms were as profitable in 2015 at the national level as they were in 2010. The gross farm receipts totaled $69.4 billion in 2015, with primary agriculture accounting for 1.5 per cent of the national gross domestic product in 2013.

Agriculture goods accounted for 2.2 per cent of Canada’s total imports and 4.6 per cent of total exports.

The Census reports that farm operators are slightly older and there are fewer farms in Canada than in 2011, but farms are on average larger and more area is being devoted to crop production.

Farm size varied considerably based on region and farm type. The largest operation on average were found in Saskatchewan (1,784 acres), while the smallest on average were located in Newfoundland and Labrador (174 acres).

The value of land and buildings used by agricultural operations increased 37.5 per cent, from $311.2 billion in 2011 to $427.9 billion in 2016.

For more information or to view the entire Census of Agriculture, visit: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/170510/dq170510a-eng.htm
Published in Research
The opening of a new broiler breeding stock hatchery by industry powerhouse Aviagen in January in northern New York State is good news for the Canadian poultry industry.

Located just a 30-minute drive from the Canadian border and fairly close to JFK International Airport, the new facility will minimize transport time to eastern Canadian broiler chicken breeder barns.
Published in Company News
Supplementing poultry rations with trace minerals like copper, zinc and manganese can help improve flock health and profitability.
Published in Bird Management
May 9, 2017, Wetaskiwin, Alta. - As the landscape of the poultry industry undergoes a major shift toward a brave new world of “post antibiotics” production, a new partnership has emerged to help producers make this transition successfully and profitably, while upholding high standards of animal health and welfare.

The partnership, involving Poultry Partners and Country Junction Feeds, is designed to integrate health and nutrition expertise and resources, including expanded antibiotic-free feed mill capacity.

The aim is to provide poultry operations with complete dedicated support to achieve an optimized approach to successful raised without antibiotics (RWA) or antibiotic free (ABF) production.

“We are in a brand new time for poultry production that requires enhanced integrated approaches,” says Dr. Tom Inglis, Managing Partner with Poultry Health Services, which is part of Poultry Partners. “On the one hand, we have to listen to what our customers and consumers want and take the steps needed to provide that in the marketplace. On the other hand, we need to do this in a way that does not sacrifice the productivity and profitability of poultry operations or sacrifice the health and welfare of the animals.”

“We believe that by optimizing the integration of nutrition and health management we can help poultry operations meet both of these requirements very successfully. It’s a new partnership that we are very excited about. We also believe it’s a model that fits the way of the future.”

Poultry Partners includes Poultry Health Services, which provides industry-leading veterinary and health management services. It also includes Nutrition Partners, which is a nutrition company that brings vitamin and mineral knowledge and support, while providing leading premix options including a poultry premix. Both companies are headquartered in Airdrie, Alberta, and collaborate as Poultry Partners serving customers across Western Canada.

“The poultry industry is shifting very quickly to ABF – a lot quicker than many envisioned,” says Darryl Lewis, President at Nutrition Partners, which is part of Poultry Partners. “The timing has never been more critical to provide integrated, value added approaches to help producers succeed in this new environment.”

For more information, visit: www.countryjunctionfeeds.com.
Published in Company News
April 25, 2017, Guelph, Ont. - Ed Benjamins, Chair of Chicken Farmers of Ontario (CFO), presented a strong case for growth in the chicken sector at the 2017 Agricultural Lenders' Conference in Guelph.

Benjamins noted that the sector had increased production by over five percent in 2015 and in 2016, and that the industry is still expecting further growth in 2017. The conference is hosted by the Poultry Industry Council and attracted more than 30 agricultural lending specialists from across the major financial institutions. Other presentations at the conference included reports from poultry sector partners, the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs and suppliers to the Ontario poultry industry.

Benjamins, who farms near Moorefield, Ontario, noted that there were five key arguments for ongoing industry growth in the Ontario chicken sector. They include:
  • Chicken protein’s alignment with current and emerging consumer tastes;
  • The industry’s size and scale in the Ontario market which fosters increased market and product innovation;
  • CFOs strength in supporting strategies to expand the industry’s profit pools;
  • The recent introduction of a chicken industry digital network (CFO Connects) which will improve efficiencies and analytical capabilities;
  • Progressive supply management leadership that is focused on transparency, accountability and leadership.
The presentation also highlighted the Board’s strong sustainable production practices, effective risk management strategies, and focus on responsible corporate governance.
Published in Business & Policy
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