Production

While the vast majority of Canadian egg producers still use conventional housing, some have had enriched colony or free-run housing systems in place for several years. These farmers have, therefore, had the time to get to know these systems and learn how to best manage flocks within them.

Published in Layers

Summer has come and gone and fall is now here. It’s once again time to take a look at your maintenance program and go over the equipment to ensure everything is running efficiently.

Published in Barn Management

With negotiations under the new United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) complete, and despite the fact Canada's chicken sector is giving up additional access, chicken farmers are relieved that over a year of uncertainty over the future of the agricultural landscape in Canada is over.

Published in News

Canadian egg farmers are concerned with the outcome of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which is now called the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA).

Published in News
Ceiling insulation and enclosed houses with multiple insulation methods are crucial to the efficient operation of a poultry house.
Published in Barn Management
Backed by the stability and predictability offered by supply management, a green shift is happening across rural Canada. One such farmer at the cutting edge of this new wave is Manitoba’s Abe Loewen. He recently invested in solar panels to heat and cool the family home, alongside his entire barn – home to 12,600 hens.
Published in Producers
U.S. food companies kept slaughter plants shut on Monday in southeastern states swamped by Hurricane Florence as catastrophic flooding killed nearly two million chickens, collapsed the walls of at least two hog manure pits, and made stretches of major roads impassable.

Florence, which has dumped up to 36 inches (91 cm) of rain on North Carolina since Thursday, was interrupting supply lines around the state and into neighboring South Carolina.

Meteorologists have warned that the worst is yet to come as rivers rise. North Carolina is a top U.S. producer of poultry, hogs and tobacco. Agriculture contributes $87 billion to the state’s economy, making it the state’s No. 1 industry.

Two North Carolina hog waste pits were structurally damaged, four were inundated with water and seven had discharges, according to the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality.

More than 3,000 lagoons in the state were unaffected, the North Carolina Pork Council said.

When manure pits overflow, there is a risk that water supplies will be contaminated with bacteria like salmonella and e. coli.

Smithfield Foods Inc. runs the world’s biggest hog plant in Tar Heel, North Carolina, near a junction where I-95 traffic has been disrupted. Smithfield closed the plant on Thursday and Friday and an employee said it was still closed on Monday. The company did not respond to requests for comment.

About 1.7 million broiler chickens that independent suppliers were raising for Sanderson Farms Inc., were killed in the floodwaters, the third-largest U.S. poultry producer said on Monday.

Some 30 poultry farms housing about 211,000 chickens each in the area of Lumberton, North Carolina, were isolated by floods, and Sanderson Farms was unable to get feed trucks to them.

“Losses of live inventory could escalate if the company does not regain access to those farms,” Sanderson Farms said in a statement. The company said it was assessing damage from the storm and warned that losses would weigh on quarterly results.

On Monday, the North Carolina Department of Transportation advised against travel in the southern, central and eastern parts of the state, noting that several sections of I-95 and I-40, which are major trucking arteries, were flooded.

The South Carolina Department of transportation said sections of I-95 were closed near the North Carolina line. U.S. railroad operator CSX Corp, which services the area, advised customers that shipments traveling through the I-95 corridor would experience delays. CSX said it was assessing damage from the storm.

“When it comes to moving product, there’s obviously challenges with major routes like I-95, I-75 and I-40 being closed and having to detour around that,” Perdue Farms spokesman Joe Forsthoffer said.

Last week, Perdue Farms shut poultry processing plants in Rockingham, North Carolina, and Dillon, South Carolina, and kept them offline on Monday because of road closures and power outages, Forsthoffer said.

“It just wasn’t safe to ask people to come in,” said Forsthoffer, who added that the privately held chicken producer would monitor road conditions to determine when it can resume slaughtering. He said a small number of poultry died on the company’s farms.

Commodity handler Cargill Inc. closed an animal-feed facility in Roanoke, Virginia, and another facility in Fayetteville, North Carolina, that handles salt, oils and grains, because they are in active flood zones, spokeswoman April Nelson said on Monday.

A third facility in Charlotte, North Carolina, was also closed and due to reopen on Tuesday, she said. On Tuesday, North Carolina Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler will attempt to survey farms from a helicopter, Ashby said.

RELATED: Sanderson Farms provides update on hurricane damage
Published in News

Sanderson Farms, Inc. recently reported that it continues to assess damage to its North Carolina assets and live production infrastructure caused by Hurricane Florence.

The Company is pleased to report that it has still received no report of serious injuries or loss of life among its employees and growers. However, many employees and growers have lost homes and property, and in some cases are being housed in shelters.

Sanderson Farms will continue to do whatever possible to help those who have been displaced. While the company is pleased its employees and growers have remained safe, the company deeply regrets the loss of animals under its care. Although the company and family farmers who care for its chickens did everything possible to prevent the loss of birds, the unprecedented rainfall from Hurricane Florence caused serious flooding that affected the company’s live grow out operations.

“I continue to be pleased that our people remained safe during this catastrophic storm,” said Joe F. Sanderson, Jr., chairman and chief executive officer of Sanderson Farms, Inc. “Those who have been displaced, lost their homes or had their lives disrupted will continue to be in our thoughts and prayers, and we will do whatever we can to help them recover from this storm. Everyone at Sanderson Farms is deeply saddened by the loss of live birds, whose well-being has been entrusted to our care, especially our farmers and live production employees who care for our birds on a daily basis. We take very seriously our responsibility for the well-being of the animals we raise, and we will continue to do everything we can to protect those birds still threatened by rising flood waters.”

As earlier reported, the company did not experience any significant damage to either of its processing facilities, feed mill or hatcheries in North Carolina. The Kinston, North Carolina, processing plant resumed one shift of operations on Tuesday, September 18, 2018.

Many roadways in and around Lumberton and St. Pauls, North Carolina, remain impassable and are closed, and local streams and rivers are expected to crest later this week. The company will resume operations at its St. Pauls processing plant once it is safe for employees to navigate roads and highways.

The company continues to assess the extent of damage to its independent contract farms and the loss of live birds. Current information indicates that 70 broiler houses out of 880 in North Carolina have flooded. Those farms housed 2.1 million chickens. Of that number, 1.35 million were in the company’s St. Pauls, North Carolina, big bird deboning division, and 755,000 birds were associated with the Kinston, North Carolina, tray pack division.

The company has been able to reach most of the farms previously isolated by flood waters to ensure adequate care and feed is available to the chickens on those farms.

Electrical power continues to be restored at a steady pace, and the company believes power will be fully restored to all of its independent farms in short order.

Sanderson Farms, Inc. is engaged in the production, processing, marketing and distribution of fresh, frozen and minimally prepared chicken. 


RELATED: Millions of chickens drown in Florence floodwaters, manure pits damaged

Published in News
Enterra — a privately held company specializing in the development and manufacture of sustainable insect-based feed ingredients for the fish, poultry and pet food industries — recently announced it has completed a major global funding round that will allow it to go ahead with the construction of three North American production facilities, including one near Balzac, Atla. The company already has a production facility in Langley, B.C.

Inside its 180,000-square-foot Balzac facility, Enterra will be raising black soldier fly larvae, an insect with a high protein and fat content that can be processed into animal feed.

The company boasts its larvae production process is completely sustainable, because the insects are fed with food waste that would otherwise be headed to landfills or compost operations. | READ MORE
Published in News
We know the ink has barely dried on this year’s Who’s Who edition – our previous issue where we profiled rising poultry stars from across the country. However, we’re already planning ahead for next year. And we once  again want your input.
Published in Farm Business
Amy and Patrick Kitchen moved from B.C. to Ontario several years ago intent on buying a farm. They knew from the start they wanted to get into market gardening. Eventually, they decided on a mixed offering. “We wanted to add livestock to the equation to diversify our income and for the manure benefits,” Patrick says.
Published in Broilers
A wealth of new innovations and strategies to help producers and their industry transition to the future will take the spotlight Oct. 10-11 at the second annual Alberta Livestock Expo in Lethbridge, Alta.

The newly expanded Expo builds on a successful inaugural event by adding an additional day to the format along with broadened program features and expanded floor space for the popular exhibitor booth spaces.

“The livestock industry has entered an exciting time of evolution, with a number of important new trends, innovations and demands shaping the future,” says Chris Tokaruk of TTT Stock Company, founding sponsor of the Expo. “With the tremendous support and participation of our many exhibitors from across all facets of the industry, combined with projected outstanding attendance, we are anticipating a very successful forum for sharing knowledge and solutions to help drive the industry forward.”

Sharing knowledge, driving progress
With expanded floor space for an additional 22 exhibitors, the Expo, hosted at Exhibition Park (South Pavilion) will feature over 70 exhibitors featuring the latest in tools, technology and tactics to optimize all types of livestock operations, including swine, poultry, beef, dairy and more.

There is a strong emphasis on innovations with practical, hands-on value for producers, as well as ones that help operations align with key trends in areas such as management, housing, welfare, genetics, feed and nutrition, reduced antimicrobial use and more.

“The opportunity to see many of the latest innovations in one place will be second-to-none,” says Tokaruk. “The Expo is also designed to provide a very enjoyable event for socializing and networking with fellow producers and industry colleagues, including potential customers and prospects.”

Broadened format, networking opportunities
With a second day added, there will be more flexibility for more people to participate, he says. “This will make it easier for everyone on the farm to attend.

With one day shows, inevitably at least one person needs to stay home to take care of the animals. Now half the employees can come one day and the other half the next day – no one has to miss out.”

New competitions: Beef rib BBQ and pork quality
The expanded format will also feature the addition of a new beef rib BBQ competition, on Wednesday, Oct. 10., and a new pork quality competition, on Thursday, Oct. 11. Those interested in participating in these competitions can contact event manager Lisa Doyle.

“We encourage entries in both of these competitions to see who will earn bragging rights for the best pork quality and the best beef ribs in Alberta. Both competitions should be a lot of fun.”

Exhibitor booth spaces have been selling quickly, reports Doyle. “At this time, we’re almost 90 per cent sold out with 100 booths sold. We’re projecting being sold out this year. There are still 12 booth spaces available in one, two, and three space blocks – we encourage those interested to reserve these quickly as they won’t be available for long.”

Sponsors key to a successful event
A strong roster of core sponsors is in place and sponsorship opportunities continue to be available, she says. Tickets are available both in advance or at the event gate, with hours for both days running from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

TTT Stock Company Ltd. is an official distributor for Hypor Inc., a Hendrix Genetics company. Both TTT Stock Company and Hypor are lead (Diamond Level) sponsors of the Expo. Full sponsor listing as well as complete event information including on tickets and booth space registration is available at www.albertalivestockexpo.com.
Published in News

Broilers in Canada, for those who don’t know, are almost exclusively raised on litter floors. In other places in the world you can find broilers raised in cage systems. Floor raised birds tend to have less breast meat bruising and damaging when compared to caged birds and this, and pressure from animal rights activists, is why it tends to be the preferred method in Canada.

Published in Barn Management
As the world population continues to escalate, so too does the concern around air quality. So, what about in your barn? What is the air quality like in and around a poultry facility? Is there a risk to human health?
Published in Broilers

Sector: Layer breeding

Published in New Technology
The best time to develop a relationship with all the professionals you need for the operation is when you start planning a facility or expansion. While every producer will develop a relationship with lawyers, bankers, accountants, contractors, processors and equipment suppliers, they often wait to get to know their nutritionist until the first feed order and their veterinarian after their first mortality or production event.
Published in Ask the Vet
Chicken Farmers of Canada (CFC) has been developing an antimicrobial use reduction strategy policy, where the main goal is to eliminate the preventive use of medically important antibiotics in commercial broiler production.
Published in Bird Management
Nesting behaviour in laying hens is complex, and according to poultry scientists such as Dr. Michelle Hunniford of the department of animal biosciences at the University of Guelph in Ontario, there’s a lot left to discover.
Published in Layers
Researchers at the University of Iowa have developed a mobile system that can inactivate avian influenza virus.

A significant issue for the poultry industry is the disposal of bird carcasses and manure when they are contaminated with avian influenza virus.

According to the "Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Response Plan" developed by the USDA, there is a clear need for better disposal technology.

One intriguing way forward is to heat the carcasses and manure in a mobile trailer to quickly react to outbreaks before they can spread. The trailer would hold multiple gasifiers, which would be used to heat up the trailer. From there, a conveyor system would take the carcasses and manure through the trailer until the virus is destroyed. The gasifiers use a solid fuel like seed corn or wood chips to provide the energy at very low cost and produce an in-situ charcoal bed that breaks down organic pollutants.

The University of Iowa has more than four years of experience in operating an industrial scale gasifier based on these principles and uses it in conjunction with lab testing and computer modeling to understand and predict general gasification behavior. The focus of this research project was to study the issues involved in trailer gasification and avian influenza virus elimination.

Project #BRU008: Analysis of Poultry Gasification Parameters for Elimination of Avian Flu Exposed Birds and Manure, was conducted by Dr. Albert Ratner, University of Iowa.

The project was recently completed by Ratner and colleagues in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at the University. They developed the design for a mobile system to heat poultry carcasses and manure to inactivate avian influenza virus. This system could be utilized during an avian influenza outbreak to quickly help eliminate the virus from infected farms and better contain the spread of an outbreak.

For more information, visit: http://www.uspoultry.org/
To veiw the full research report, CLICK HERE
Published in New Technology
Chicken farming in Canada’s most eastern province is not without its challenges, but one young farmer is keen to tackle broiler production on the “Rock”.
Published in Producers

Subscription Centre

 
New Subscription
 
Already a Subscriber
 
Customer Service
 
View Digital Magazine Renew

Most Popular

Latest Events

No events

We are using cookies to give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. To find out more, read our Privacy Policy.