Production
Some perceive the term Veterinary-Client-Patient Relationship (VCPR) as formal and rarely used or understood. It does not have to be that way. Simply stated, a VCPR involves a veterinarian and poultry producer developing and maintaining a working relationship.
Published in Ask the Vet
There are some types of E. coli (known as avian pathogenic E. coli [APEC]) that can cause serious or fatal colibacillosis infection in chickens. Many factors predispose birds to the infections.
Published in Layers
In livestock farming – or really, in any complex endeavour – a good start is critical. With raising broilers, deficiencies in starting care have often been overlooked in years past for several reasons, according to Dr. Stewart Ritchie, a poultry veterinarian and owner of Canadian Poultry Consultants and S. J. Ritchie Research Farms Ltd. in Abbotsford, B.C.
Published in Broilers
Ensuring that Canadians have access to safe and healthy food is a top priority for the federal government. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), along with their federal food safety partners, Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada, as well as industry, remind Canadians about the importance of always fully cooking frozen raw breaded poultry products prior to consumption, as well as using proper food handling techniques and following cooking instructions to limit the risk of foodborne illnesses as salmonella is commonly found in raw chicken and frozen raw breaded chicken products.

Extensive efforts have been made by the federal food safety partners and the industry to increase consumer awareness that these products are raw and need to be fully cooked before consumption, as well as significant attempts by the industry to improve labelling and cooking instructions on packages.

Despite these efforts, frozen raw breaded chicken products continue to be identified as a source of salmonella infection in Canada.

As such, the CFIA is working with industry to identify and implement measures at the manufacturing/processing level to reduce salmonella to below a detectable amount in frozen raw breaded chicken products such as chicken nuggets, chicken fingers, chicken strips, popcorn chicken and chicken burgers that are packaged for retail sale. This approach focuses the responsibility on the poultry industry and represents a fundamental change to existing requirements for frozen raw breaded chicken products.

These new measures call for processors to identify salmonella as a hazard and to implement changes in order to produce an end product that reduces salmonella to below a detectable amount. The CFIA has granted industry a 12-month implementation period, to begin immediately, to make these changes.

"The poultry industry's objective is to provide consumers with affordable, safe poultry products, every day. We will continue to work with CFIA to ensure consumers have access to safe frozen raw breaded chicken products," said Robin Horel, president and CEO, Canadian Poultry & Egg Processors Council.

In the last 10 years the incidence of salmonella illness in Canada has steadily increased. This increase has been driven by Salmonella enteritidis (SE), the most common strain of salmonella in the food supply that is often associated with poultry.

While frozen raw breaded chicken products often appear to be "pre-cooked" or "ready-to-eat," these products contain raw chicken and are intended to be handled and prepared the same way as other raw poultry. The safety of these products rests with the consumer who is expected to cook it, according to the directions on the package.

In 2015, industry voluntarily developed additional labelling on frozen raw breaded chicken products that included more prominent and consistent messaging, such as "raw," "uncooked" or "must be cooked" as well as explicit instructions not to microwave the product and they voluntarily introduced adding cooking instructions on the inner-packaging bags.

For more information, visit: http://www.inspection.gc.ca

Published in News
Cobb-Brazil is investing more than one-million dollars in a new fleet of state-of-the-art chick transporters to make sure chicks arrive to customers in top condition. Brazil's large landscape with spread-out farms previously presented a challenge for conventional trailers without specialized climate control.

The first of the new vehicles has already proved its worth in delivering chicks with zero mortality and another six trailers will join the fleet by the end of March. The transporters were designed as part of a joint project with global trailer manufacturer Smithway and Brazil's Facchini, located in São Jose do Rio Preto where Cobb Brazil is headquartered.

The new trailer is equipped with a 100,000 BTU air conditioning system with generators to provide electricity for cooling and heating. The vehicle is designed without corridors so it can hold up to 60,000 chicks - twice the capacity of conventional trailers.

"During their first days chicks need to be kept in constant warmth to ensure good early development," said Lucas Lima, Cobb logistics manager in Brazil. "Conventional trailers depend greatly on the external climate as they are only equipped with humidification, exhaust and ventilation systems. We needed a trailer equipped with independent climate control to ensure the wellbeing and ideal environment for our chicks."

Two fuel-powered generators enable cooling even if the truck's engine is off - an essential feature that allows for periods when the driver is taking a break or, for instance, when the truck is waiting at the airport before loading. The generators operate separately, with the second one only used if the main generator fails.

Internal air quality control is also improved with the new technology. With little air exchange, the chance of harmful organisms circulating inside the trailer is reduced.

"We have been using the new transporter since November and are very pleased with the results," added Lima. "We have been working with near-zero mortality during chick transport as a result of the excellent temperature control and comfort within the trailers. Our goal is that the chicks are delivered to the customer in the same condition they left the hatchery."
Published in News
Archer's Poultry Farm Ltd.
Sector - Layer, hatchery
Location - Trenton, Ont.
Published in Companies
DATE: March 5, 2018

LOCATION: Kujanga, Jagatsinghpur, Orissa

DETAILS: Information received of a recurrence of a listed disease on [and dated] March 1, 2018 from Mr Devendra Chaudhry, secretary, Animal Husbandry, Dairying & Fisheries, Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare, New Delhi, India. The outbreak status is continuing (or date resolved not provided).

SOURCE:
http://www.promedmail.org/post/5667511
ProMED-mail post
http://www.promedmail.org/
ProMED-mail is a program of the International Society for Infectious Diseases
http://www.isid.org

Published in Disease watch
As the Canadian egg industry phases out conventional cages, most farmers will decide to install free-run or enriched cage housing. For its part, poultry housing maker Big Dutchman is presently seeing a 50/50 split on its Canadian sales of the two housing types, but sales lead Ron Wardrop says he’s recently seeing a little more interest from producers in enriched cages.
Published in Layers
The environmental impacts of livestock and poultry production are a challenge for agriculture. Ammonia, along with greenhouse gases like nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide and methane, are key areas of concern.
Published in Turkeys
DATE: March 3, 2018

LOCATION: Slagelse, Zealand, Denmark

DETAILS:
The [Danish] national veterinary institute, DTU Vet, has revealed it has discovered bird flu in a dead white-tailed eagle found near Slagelse in Zealand. According to the Food and Environment Ministry, the bird flu type is most likely H5H6, which is highly deadly to birds. There's no need for the public to be overly alarmed, said the ministry.

For now, the discovery won't lead to more stringent protocol for fowl farmers, but that could change should more contaminated birds be found, such as in late 2016. According to Larsen, it's the 1st instance of bird flu discovered in a wild bird in Denmark since April 2017. And there hasn't been a bird flu case among kept Danish birds since February 2017.

SOURCE:
http://www.promedmail.org/post/5662330
ProMED-mail post
http://www.promedmail.org/
ProMED-mail is a program of the International Society for Infectious Diseases
http://www.isid.org
Published in Disease watch
With the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) renegotiations on the table, there has been much concern that Canada’s supply management system will once again be on the chopping block. According to a recent survey conducted by the Angus Reid Institute, some Canadians think it should be.
Published in Emerging Trends
Researchers at The Pirbright Institute have created a new method of genetically modifying the Marek’s disease vaccine so that it is able to protect against another destructive poultry virus called infectious bursal disease (IBD), and potentially others such as avian influenza and Newcastle disease. This approach could lead to a reduction in the number of vaccines that need to be administered to each bird.

For the first time, Pirbright scientists have been able to use a gene editing system called CRISPR/cas9 to add a gene of the IBD virus into a current Marek’s disease vaccine virus. The added genetic material protects poultry against IBD in addition to the protection already offered by the Marek’s disease vaccine, meaning that bird owners would only need to use one vaccine instead of two. For the full story, click here.
Published in News
The updated National Farm Animal Care Council code of practice for laying hens contains many specifications for foraging, perches and nests – enrichments that allow the hens to engage in natural behaviours. These enhancements vary to some degree among housing providers. Here’s what some of them offer and why.
Published in Layers
As it marks its 75th year in business, family-owned and operated Sargent Farms is investing $10 million to enhance and retrofit its halal chicken processing facility in Milton.

The upgrade project, scheduled to begin this spring, will ensure the third-generation business will continue to deliver the highest quality, fresh products to a growing base of loyal customers in the retail, food service and restaurant sectors for decades to come.

“Milton has been an important part of our history and our home base for three quarters of a century,” says Bob Sargent, Vice President of Sargent Farms. “We’re committed to making the investments needed to continue growing our operation, provide our customers the best possible products and help make our community a great place to live and work.”

The footprint of Sargent Farms’ processing plant in Milton’s downtown core will remain the same, but all processing equipment inside the facility will be replaced with the latest, state-of-the-art technology. The retrofit will be carried out in stages over three years, primarily during off hours, allowing the plant to continue operating throughout the project.

Sargent Farms, which produces 100% Halal chicken processed by hand, has experienced significant growth over the past decade, driven in part by two retail stores it recently opened in Milton and Mississauga.

The new processing equipment will increase the plant’s efficiency, allowing it to satisfy growing consumer demand by processing more chicken in a shorter amount of time. Greater efficiency will also contribute to the processing plant’s overall profitability, increasing stability for its workforce of almost 300 employees.

Among other benefits, the project will help Sargent Farms continue to enhance its animal care standards and diversify its line of top-quality, local chicken products.

This latest upgrade for the Milton plant follows an investment of approximately $4 million in 2014.

“It’s important to us to continue to build on our long-standing reputation as a progressive and innovative processor. The investments we’ve made in recent years and will continue to make in this project will help us make good on that commitment,” says Kevin Thompson, CEO of Sargent Farms.

In addition to its Milton headquarters and processing operation, Sargent Farms also operates a further processing facility in Mississauga.
Published in News
Footpad dermatitis (FPD) in broiler chickens is characterized by ulcerated lesions on the underside of the foot, and is associated with poor litter conditions – typically characterized by high moisture and ammonia levels. Broiler FPD presents itself within the first two weeks of age and increases in severity as bird body weight and footpad (FP) contact with litter increases.
Published in Broilers
Poor skeletal health in commercial laying hens was first documented as a production issue in the 1950s. It became an animal welfare concern in the 1980s, when scientists first documented a high prevalence of bone fractures after handling hens at end of lay.
Published in Layers
Turkey Farmers of Canada (TFC) is deeply troubled and concerned about the signing of the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP).

“We believe this deal will harm the turkey sector,” said TFC chair Mark Davies. “There was no need to maintain the market access levels of the original TPP, which were made in response to demands by the U.S., which is no longer part of the agreement.”

After the U.S. pulled out from the original Trans-Pacific Partnership, the remaining 11 member countries agreed on January 23, 2018 to a revised trade agreement in principle. The agreement is scheduled to officially be signed in early March 2018.

This deal will increase import access to the Canadian turkey market by 71 per cent, representing $270 million in lost farm cash receipts over the next 19 years, and a farm output loss of at least 4.5 per cent.

“Farmers’ livelihoods will be impacted by corresponding farm income losses, without even taking into account downward pressure on farm prices or the market growth Canadian farmers will lose to exporters,” said Davies. “Total economic activity losses in the order of $111 million per year will occur throughout the value-chain.”

“We will be losing family farms, at a time when 90 per cent of Canadians want turkey produced in Canada according to a 2017 survey,” Davies noted. “The original TPP agreement came with commitments to mitigation and remedies for border irritants. We look forward to working with the government to follow through on these commitments and work on solutions tailored to our sector.”
Published in Trade
Ontario is supporting farmers and agri-food businesses to improve their energy efficiency, save money and fight climate change through two new programs from the Green Ontario Fund, a non-profit provincial agency funded by proceeds from the province's cap on pollution and carbon market.

Chris Ballard, Minister of the Environment and Climate Change, was recently joined by Parminder Sandhu, Green Ontario Fund board chair and interim CEO, and Dr. Helena Jaczek, MPP for Oak Ridges-Markham, to announce the launch of the GreenON Agriculture and GreenON Food Manufacturing programs.

GreenON Agriculture will provide funding to help improve energy efficiency in climate-controlled production facilities such as swine or poultry barns, greenhouses and grain dryers.

Improvements include new or upgraded energy curtains and cover materials in greenhouses and building insulation in walls and ceilings of livestock facilities.

GreenON Food Manufacturing will help encourage food and beverage processing facilities to adopt innovative, cleaner technologies, with opportunities for low-carbon fuel use, waste heat recovery, improved air balance and upgraded refrigeration systems.

Supporting farmers and agri-food businesses in the transition to a low carbon economy is part of Ontario's plan to create fairness and opportunity during this period of rapid economic change. The plan includes a higher minimum wage and better working conditions, free tuition for hundreds of thousands of students, easier access to affordable child care, and free prescription drugs for everyone under 25 through the biggest expansion of medicare in a generation.

“A competitive and sustainable agri-food sector is vital to Ontario’s economy. Helping our province’s covered agriculture and food and beverage processing sectors transition to a low-carbon economy will help ensure their long-term sustainability while supporting Ontario’s commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions," said Jeff Leal, Minister of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs.
Published in News
Nuscience, a member of the Royal Agrifirm Group, has announced the introduction of its elite level feed technology suite into the Canadian market, under the Biotica product brand via strategic marketing partnership with Canadian Bio-Systems Inc.

The launch of Biotica introduces Nuscience feed technology across Canadian poultry, swine and ruminant sectors, offering producers and industry fresh solutions to employ as part of strategies aligned with optimizing production and meeting new marketplace requirements and demands.

“The opportunity for livestock industries to benefit from new science-driven, feed ingredient-based solutions is rapidly advancing,” says Rob Patterson, CBS Inc, technical director. “Nuscience technology stands at the leading edge globally. We are pleased to partner with Nuscience to offer Biotica across Canada as part of our CBS Inc. Feed Science Platforms.”

Future is now

Biotica is a functional feed additive. It is available in tailored formulations for different types of poultry, as well as for swine and ruminants, with versatility to support a broad range of production systems and market opportunities. Biotica fits well with advanced strategies designed to support health, well-being and overall performance of animals, including those raised under strict judicious use principles regarding the use of antibiotics.

“In the global animal feed industry, the future is now,” says Rob Goedegeburre, global lead, Health4U Feed Additives, Nuscience. “The Canadian market is among those embracing change and innovation. We are pleased through our partnership with Canadian Bio-Systems Inc. to provide our most advanced feed technology to this increasingly progressive market.”

The Nuscience technology featured in Biotica has become a market leader globally with a proven decade-plus track record among feed formulations designed to optimize animal and production benefits without the inclusion of antibiotic growth promoters.

Production systems in Canada have become increasingly focused on judicious use principles and veterinary oversight. Canada has set December 2018 as the deadline for moving all use of antibiotics to prescription only.

New world of feed technology

Nuscience approaches the animal feed industry with two focused business units, Nutrition4U and Health4U. Nutrition4U by Nuscience is a range of young animal nutrition concepts, customized premixes and performing concentrates. Health4U by Nuscience, which includes the technology featured in Biotica, offers innovative additives and functional feed ingredients.

Royal Agrifirm Group, headquartered in the Netherlands, is a leading agricultural cooperative with an international network of subsidiaries in 16 countries within Europe, South America and Asia and a worldwide distribution network. It is focused on delivering measurable, relevant and sustainable value at farm, field and industry.

Innovation focus

CBS Inc., based in Calgary, Alta., is an innovation-focused company with global reach that researches, develops and manufactures a wide range of bio-based products used in feed, food and industrial applications. It is a pioneer and leader in enzymes and other bio-based feed technology options, leveraging over 30 years of research and development.

CBS Inc. Feed Science Platforms include multi-carbohydrase enzyme technology, phytogenics & probiotics, grain management technology, enhanced yeast technology and functional fatty acids. Producers and industry can contact their CBS Inc. sales representative for more details. More information on CBS Inc. and its comprehensive line of feed technology is also available at www.canadianbio.com.
Published in News
Send your questions to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  and our team of industry experts will answer them in an upcoming edition of Canadian Poultry Magazine’s Ask the Vet.

In the latest edition of Ask the Vet... 
What is the difference between ionophores and non-ionphores (chemicals)?

Virtually all poultry become exposed to the coccidial parasite, which often causes the important disease coccidiosis, noted by mortality and enteritis. Often, the enteritis can trigger another important disease, necrotic enteritis.

Between coccidiosis and necrotic enteritis, flocks can experience high mortality (=>20 per cent), unthriftiness, poor feed efficiency, and is the case with all disease, undue bird suffering.

Because coccidiosis is such a threat to poultry, industry has come up with a number of compounds (anticoccidials) that reduce the risk of this parasite. Coccidiosis is a risk throughout the life of a bird so it is not surprising that anticoccidials were developed for use in feed to be where the parasite resides (the digestive system) and to give continuous protection for the life of the flock. | READ MORE

Click here to view the latest Ask the Vet columns!
Published in Ask the Vet

Subscription Centre

 
New Subscription
 
Already a Subscriber
 
Customer Service
 
View Digital Magazine Renew

Most Popular

Latest Events

No events

We are using cookies to give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. To find out more, read our Privacy Policy.