Success in Agriculture
After building a career in the electrical trade, Steve DeVries suddenly found himself returning to the family broiler farm. After the sudden passing of his father, the long-planned transfer of the family farm was quickly accelerated. “His passing pushed everything forward about 20 years,” he recalls.
Published in Producers
Amy and Patrick Kitchen moved from B.C. to Ontario several years ago intent on buying a farm. They knew from the start they wanted to get into market gardening. Eventually, they decided on a mixed offering. “We wanted to add livestock to the equation to diversify our income and for the manure benefits,” Patrick says.
Published in Broilers
Are you or do you know a Canadian poultry operation or industry member that prospers through diversification? Nominate them today to potentially have them recognized in our 2019 Who's Who issue!

Canadian Poultry magazine’s Who’s Who issue is released every July with the goal of shining a light on stand-out members of the Canadian poultry industry.

The theme for the 2019 Who’s Who issue is diversity. We’re searching across the country and in different parts of the poultry industry for people who have an interesting and broad mix of focuses. 

Make your nomination today!
Published in Producers
Did you know that September is National Chicken Month? Each year, Chicken Farmers of Canada has celebrated chicken farming throughout the whole month of September and this year we are as excited as ever.
Published in Marketing Boards
Dr. Elijah Kiarie’s interest in farm animals originated from growing up on a small family farm in Kenya. He described obtaining a bachelor’s degree in agriculture, majoring in animal science, as the catalyst for fueling his interest in animal nutrition.
Published in Researchers
As the poultry industry across Canada enters a period of unprecedented modern-era change with the convergence of several big issues and targets for improvement, a major advantage is emerging in the form of innovation-focused veterinary companies that are embracing a progressive mindset and expanded role to help producers and their industry meet the challenge.

“We are at the forefront of a new era of poultry production – no question,” says Dr. Tom Inglis, a leading poultry veterinarian who is also founder and managing partner at Poultry Health Services. “The industry is rapidly evolving. As veterinarians, we too must embrace new models and new ways of thinking to help the industry adapt and succeed.”

The perfect storm of key issues and rising expectations coming together includes the need to address antimicrobial stewardship, animal care and sustainability excellence, along with overall profitability, while meeting the increasingly specific requirements of customers and consumers spanning a broadened range of diversified marketing opportunities.

Aligning health strategies to broader game plan
The role of veterinarians in diagnosing and treating health issues has never been more important. However, they must increasingly do so with an eye to these additional requirements, pressures, demands and opportunities. They must align poultry health strategies within a broader game plan for success tailored to the specific needs and objectives of each operation.

The emphasis of veterinary approaches is expanding more strongly from simply ‘diagnose and treat’ to prevention and surveillance. Among the most progressive veterinary services providers, it is also shifting to a more central strategic advisory role, invested in the overall management and success of poultry production.

Integrated approach pays dividends
“Rather than simply a strict health focus, there is a rising need for veterinarians to adopt bigger picture viewpoints and to contribute to broader strategies involving collaboration and coordination with additional areas of expertise,” Inglis says. “Health approaches and considerations ultimately touch all aspects a poultry operation. We can have a stronger central role in overall strategy and helping producers reconcile and align various pressures and needs. This is an approach we have embraced with our own practice. We see it as the way of the future.”

Poultry Health Services is a leading example of a veterinary company embracing the concept of integration, including prominently through its participation in Poultry Partners. Poultry Partners is an in innovative model started by Poultry Health Services, which provides veterinary and health management services, in collaboration with Nutrition Partners, which offers nutrition options and formulations. The combined initiative offers an integrated approach to animal health, nutrition, on-farm management and business development services.

Key examples: Three top areas of change
Three major areas of change stand out for poultry operations for the remainder of 2018 and into 2019, says Inglis. All are areas where veterinarians have a critical role to play in contributing to integrated approaches – and where a progressive model such as Poultry Partners has unique advantages.

Antimicrobial stewardship. The first is antimicrobial stewardship. New restrictions and tighter oversight are becoming the new normal not only in poultry production but across animal agriculture. In the U.S., the new Veterinary Feed Directive has been implemented over the past 24 months, combining with retailer demands to drive a dramatic shift away from reliance on antimicrobials as a production tool.

Canada is advancing in a parallel direction and has set the end of December 2018 as the deadline for moving all use of antimicrobials in agriculture to prescription only.

Animal care. The second is animal care. Customers and consumers continue to demand enhanced transparency and verification demonstrating high standards of care and welfare. This is one factor among several that have fueled the development of updated codes of practice across the industry. Associations such as Chicken Farmers of Canada have built upon this further by introducing branded, auditable raised with care programs.

Sustainability excellence. A third key area – one with broad components – is sustainability excellence. In addition to antimicrobial stewardship and animal care, this ever-broadening category also encompasses varied components such as housing, biosecurity, environment, quality, food safety, carbon footprint and water & waste management.

Boosting overall profitability
Progress in all three areas ties into overall profitability, with health strategies being a central connection point, observes Inglis. For example, Poultry Partners has found that many farms have 10 to 30 per cent untapped profit potential tied to the combination of health, nutrition and management approaches.

For veterinary companies serving poultry operations, an important focus in helping to address these challenges is to serve as a valued knowledge source keeping up to date with the latest expectations, trends and opportunities. In addition, the key to success today is increasingly to apply more holistic integrated thinking that considers how various aspects of production inter-relate and influence one another.

Dynamic approaches to address today's needs
“Production systems are very dynamic,” says Inglis. “The strategies we apply must be dynamic as well. We are more effective when we look not just at one or two needs or desired outcomes but rather the system as a whole and the needs and opportunities as a whole. All aspects of production – whether it be health, nutrition, management, environment or another component – all influence one another. Strategies that take a broader view and encompass more of these considerations have a better opportunity to optimize results. The ability to do this well is becoming a defining characteristic of the most successful operations.”

Over the past year Poultry Health Services, based in Airdrie, Alberta, has expanded its office base into Ontario via partnership with South West Ontario Veterinary Services located in Stratford.

Poultry Health Services and Poultry Partners clients are supported from the new location. “With Poultry Partners, we have a collaborative effort between veterinarians, nutritionists and industry experts, designed to support the success of poultry operations through custom programs and services tailored to individual needs” says Inglis. “It’s about teamwork . . . but more important it’s about results.”

Further insights from Inglis are available in a “Q&A: Inside the new world of poultry health” on the Poultry Partners website, www.poultrypartners.ca.
Published in Farm Business
Poultry veterinarian Ben Schlegel’s resume reads more like that of someone who is on the brink of retirement, not someone who’s barely in his 30s.
Published in Producers
Tim Lambert, CEO of the Egg Farmers of Canada (EFC) was recently honoured at the University of Guelph Alumni Awards of Excellence Gala.

Lambert has an honours degree in animal and poultry science and is the longest-serving CEO of EFC. Lambert is a leader, advocate and change-agent in both the Canadian and global agricultural sectors. Well known for his pursuit of excellence in management, evidence-based decision-making, and organizational culture, Tim has spurred tremendous growth in production and sales for egg farmers in Canada.

He was a driving force in establishing the International Egg Foundation (IEF), which helps develop local knowledge in remote locations around the world. The IEF builds expertise and entrepreneurial skills to increase the production and consumption of the high-quality protein found in eggs. Tim oversaw construction of a sustainable operation in Swaziland that now delivers thousands of eggs to orphaned children.

Many successful programs and initiatives have taken shape under Lambert’s leadership at EFC— particularly, a unique multidisciplinary network of university research chairs, including one at the University of Guelph, that pairs the latest scientific evidence with innovation, sustainability and growth within the egg industry.

Lambert is an esteemed alumnus whose outstanding accomplishments in the agricultural industry, along with his humanitarian efforts, bring great pride to the University of Guelph.
Published in Companies
Have you ever seen the Scottish Highland Games and wondered what these people do for their day job? If you guessed that the burly, bearded guy in a kilt tossing a caber was a turkey geneticist, you would have been cheering on Owen Willems.
Published in Producers
Chicken farming in Canada’s most eastern province is not without its challenges, but one young farmer is keen to tackle broiler production on the “Rock”.
Published in Producers
There’s no better way to learn than getting your hands dirty… something Alberta turkey and broiler producers, Marc and Hinke Therrien know all too well. Being adaptable and learning on the job has played a major role in the young couple’s success.
Published in Producers
The Chief Veterinary Officer (CVO) for Canada and OIE Delegate for Canada, Dr. Jaspinder Komal, welcomes the evaluation of Canada's veterinary services that was published recently by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), the global standard-setting body for animal health and welfare.

The OIE has found Canada to be a top performing country and a leading example for meeting international veterinary service standards, with no major weaknesses. The full CVO's statement is available in its entirety on the CFIA's website.

The evaluation, conducted at Canada's request, was coordinated by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and involved federal, provincial and territorial governments and representatives from the private veterinary sector, academia and veterinary regulators. The full Performance of Veterinary Services (PVS) Evaluation Report is available on the OIE's website.

The CFIA will be working with federal, provincial and territorial partners as well as representatives from the veterinary sector and the animal industry to further strengthen veterinary services across the country.

The CFIA continues to lead on other initiatives to improve animal health, veterinary public health and animal welfare in Canada.

"With the majority of Canada's veterinary services getting the top five out of five rating based on the OIE's international standards, and with the implementation of the OIE's recommendations, Canada will further strengthen its position as a global leader in promoting the health of animals and protecting the public from animal disease. This will also help strengthen international trade and economic opportunities," says, Jaspinder Komal, Chief Veterinary Officer and OIE Delegate for Canada.
Published in Welfare
After decades as a highly respected researcher, teacher and mentor, monogastric nutritionist Derrick Anderson has developed an eye for talent. He sees something special in Dalhousie University researcher Stephanie Collins. “I think she’s one of the rising stars in Canadian poultry,” he says of the young scientist. “She’s the next generation of nutritionist.”
Published in Producers
The son and nephew of Quebec’s first organic egg producers, David Lefebvre had plenty of unique experiences growing up. One of his fondest memories is gathering eggs with his family on weekends. It was no easy task.
Published in Producers
Alltech presented the 35th Alltech Student Research Manuscript Award to Cristiano Bortoluzzi, a doctoral student at the University of Georgia, during the 107th annual Poultry Science Association (PSA) meeting, held in San Antonio, Texas, on July 23 to 26.

This award is given to a student who is the senior author of an outstanding research manuscript in Poultry Science or The Journal of Applied Poultry Research, and only students awarded Certificates of Excellence for research presentations at an annual PSA meeting can compete.

Bortoluzzi’s winning paper — entitled “Sodium butyrate improved performance while modulating the cecal microbiota and regulating the expression of intestinal immune-related genes of broiler chickens” — evaluated the effect of sodium butyrate (SB) on performance, expression of immune-related genes in the cecal tonsils, and cecal microbiota of broiler chickens when dietary energy and amino acids concentrations were reduced.

The paper results confirmed that SB had positive effects on the productive performance of broilers fed nutritionally reduced diets, partially by modulating the cecal microbiota and exerting immune modulatory effects.

"Alltech is proud to sponsor this award, as innovation is the core of our business," said Dr. Kayla Price, poultry technical manager for Alltech Canada. “We support advancements in the poultry industry and encourage students to publish their research and communicate their discoveries, which can positively influence the future of poultry production."

Cristiano Bortoluzzi is a doctor of veterinary medicine and is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in the department of poultry science at the University of Georgia.

He grew up on a farm in southern Brazil with dairy cows, pigs and poultry, so his passion for animal production started when he was young and has influenced his career path.

Bortoluzzi completed several internships in his first year of vet school and found that poultry nutrition and health interested him the most.

Throughout his studies, he was actively involved in research trials, attended scientific meetings and learned about the intestinal health/immune system of broilers and the importance of nutrition.

While working toward his master’s degree, he spent three months working with the United States Department of Agriculture/Agriculture Research Service (USDA/ARS) in Indiana.

In January 2015, he started his Ph.D. in animal science at Purdue University, later moving to the University of Georgia. Bortoluzzi has published 18 papers and will finish his Ph.D. in the fall. He is looking forward to working in and contributing his expertise to the poultry industry.

Alltech has sponsored the Alltech Student Research Manuscript Award since 2000, recognizing young leaders in scientific innovation for their commitment to publishing and sharing their work within the poultry sector.
Published in Researchers
It’s that time of year again where we celebrate industry leaders from across the country. Indeed, our annual Who’s Who issue is back. This time we’ve added a few new twists. For one, we gave the issue a theme. Our first premise is “Rising Poultry Stars” and each year after we’ll be giving the issue a different focus.
Published in Farm Business
Colleagues, friends and dignitaries recently gathered in Guelph at Alltech’s Canadian headquarters to celebrate the global animal nutrition company’s 30th anniversary operating in Canada.

Founded in 1988 by Dr. Pearse Lyons, Alltech Canada has offices and representatives strategically located across the country. In 2016, Alltech acquired Masterfeeds and added a strong network of farm-focused dealers to accommodate and service farmers and ranchers nationwide.

“Canada is one of the largest agricultural producers and exporters in the world,” said Stuart McGregor, general manager of Alltech Canada. “We are proud to celebrate 30 years in Canada and look forward to many more supporting our farm and ranch customers across the country.”

Coinciding with the Alltech Canada 30th anniversary celebration, the World Trade Center Kentucky and Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles visited the Guelph area on an agriculture and agribusiness-focused trade mission. Canada is Kentucky’s top agriculture and agri-food export market, and in 2016, Kentucky’s agriculture and related industries exported US$230 million to Canada.

“Kentucky agriculture needs international trade, but more importantly, the rest of the world needs Kentucky agriculture,” Quarles says. “The goal of this agriculture-focused trade mission is to generate export opportunities by connecting our farm community to new international markets.”

While in Canada, the trade mission delegates visited a grain farm, toured the University of Guelph Livestock Research and Innovation Centre, participated in roundtable discussions and attended an Agriculture and Agribusiness Symposium, business-to-business meetings and business networking receptions. The mission was sponsored by Kentucky Farm Bureau, Masterfeeds/Alltech, the Kentucky Distillers’ Association and the Kentucky Thoroughbred Association.
Published in News
Maple Leaf Foods recently announced that it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire two poultry plants and associated supply from Cericola Farms, a privately held company.

Located in Bradford, Ontario and Drummondville, Quebec, collectively the two plants process approximately 32 million kg of chicken annually.

Maple Leaf has also entered into an agreement to secure 100 per cent of the processed chicken volume from Cericola's primary processing plant located in Schomberg, Ont., and holds an option to acquire this asset and associated plant supply in three years.

"Cericola is a leader in raised without antibiotics and organic chicken. This acquisition will build Maple Leaf's market leadership in these value-added categories and enable us to meet growing consumer demand," said Michael McCain, president and CEO. Founder of Cericola Farms, Mary Cericola said, "Our vision over the past 60 years has been to provide wholesome and natural poultry products to our customers. It is this tradition of excellence that aligns Maple Leaf and Cericola."

This acquisition will provide Maple Leaf with additional supply and value-added processing capability to advance its leadership in higher value categories.

Maple Leaf Foods has transitioned most of its flagship Maple Leaf Prime chicken brand to Prime RWA, where the Canadian market is growing at approximately 25% annually.

Chicken is the most consumed and fastest growing meat protein segment in North America. Cericola specializes in air-chilled processing of antibiotic free and animal by-product free and organic poultry products.

The transaction will be financed through a combination of cash-on-hand and drawings under the existing credit facility and is expected to close in August, subject to normal closing requirements including Competition Bureau review.
Published in News
Lilydale, one of Canada's leading poultry brands is celebrating an important milestone. Lilydale is amongst Canada's most remarkable business success stories with innovative products such as fully cooked, ready to eat carved poultry or Ancient Grains breaded turkey strips.

It's early 1940s and a group of Alberta farmers join together to create a co-operative. At first, the co-operative focuses on eggs but in 1941, the group acquires a processing plant and becomes known as Alberta Poultry Producers Limited. The plant processes both eggs and poultry.

Over the years, the Alberta Poultry Producers Limited business grows and the organization expands its production capabilities in Alberta, British Columbia and Saskatchewan. The name Lilydale first appears in 1976 when the group becomes known as Lilydale Co-operative Limited. In 2005, the company renames itself Lilydale Inc. and in 2012 is acquired by Sofina Foods Inc.

"Lilydale has become and remains one of Canada's favourite fresh and further processed poultry product manufacturers because of the dedication, passion and hard work of all the employees, past and present, who tirelessly worked to grow its presence and provide high quality and delicious poultry products," said Wendy Harris, director, marketing for the Lilydale brand at Sofina Foods Inc.

"Giving back to the communities is an integral part of our company's values. With the support of the Sofina Foundation, our employees volunteered their time at the Ronald McDonald House Charities Northern Alberta to clean, paint and redesign the kitchen which was not meeting the needs of the families that this charity serves. In addition, each year, our employees participate in our Dream Builders' Campaign aiming at collecting funds for local children's charities. During the 2017 festive season, over 10,000 families were able to enjoy a turkey dinner through our support of various charities and shelters across the country," added Harris.

To mark this special anniversary year, Lilydale revamped its website (www.lilydale.com) and packaging, and is launching several initiatives including a contest: "75 Years, 75 Winners." The contest opened June 4th in key markets in Canada and closes August 5th. 
Published in Companies
Olymel L.P. executives announced the acquisition of all the shares of Pinty's Delicious Foods Inc., an Ontario poultry slaughtering and processing company that specializes in fully cooked products and other related products.

Headquartered in Burlington, Ontario, Pinty's employs 360 people. The company operates three processing plants, respectively located in Port Colborne, Paris, and Oakville, Ontario. Pinty's markets its products throughout Canada and the United States under the brands Pinty's Food Service, Pinty's Pub & Grill, Pinty's Eat Well, Pinty's Perfect Portions and Pinty's Delicious Food Inc.

"Olymel is confident that this transaction will benefit our development and growth. We are proud to welcome the employees of Pinty's Delicious Foods Inc. Over the past 70 years, Pinty's has developed great expertise on the Canadian and American markets by offering innovative and exclusive products under brand names that have become extremely popular with many consumers and customers. We know that this family business has been served by passionate owners throughout its history. We are also pleased to invest and strengthen our presence in Ontario and on the Canadian market," said Réjean Nadeau, Olymel's president and CEO.

Current employees of Pinty's Delicious Foods Inc. will continue to work within the company. The closing of this transaction is subject to the approval of the Competition Bureau. Meanwhile, both companies will continue their activities separately and independently.

"The owners and management of Pinty's Delicious Foods are happy to have found a Canadian buyer. We are confident that Olymel will grow our company and ensure it a promising future. I truly believe that our employees will benefit from the advantages of working for a large group like Olymel, a company that has a unique expertise in the processing and marketing of poultry products. We are proud of the company and the business network that we have built around Pinty's brands for decades and I am certain that this transaction will also benefit our customers and consumers," said Jack Vanderlaan, executive chairman of Pinty's.

This acquisition is part of Olymel's action to consolidate its position in Canada as the leader of the pork and poultry slaughtering and processing sector. Specifically, in the poultry sector, Olymel owns seven poultry slaughtering and processing establishments in Quebec, Ontario and New Brunswick serving the entirety of the Canadian market under the brands Olymel, Flamingo and Galco, in addition to placing its production capacity at the service of private brands. Pinty's will pursue its activities, continue to serve its current customers and honour its supply agreements according to the prevailing poultry market conventions in Ontario.
Published in Company News
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