Utilizing vaccines to reduce antimicrobial use

Utilizing vaccines to reduce antimicrobial use

By controlling certain viral diseases with vaccination, producers can reduce on-farm antimicrobial usage.

Nesting in enriched cages

Nesting in enriched cages

While multiple studies have uncovered some of what affects nesting and pre-nesting behaviour, much remains to be learned.

Maximizing broiler performance

Maximizing broiler performance

Reaching genetic potential through best management practices.

Global poultry production has entered an era of increased oversight of antibiotic use during live production. Being able to treat sick animals with antibiotics is important. As an industry, we must continue to do our part to maintain antibiotic effectiveness so they can be used as tools for sick animals. As with any change, there will be a learning curve moving forward.
A valid veterinarian-client-patient-relationship (VCPR) is simply the term given to describe the relationship the poultry farmer and the attending veterinarian share.
When it comes to animal welfare, Alexandra Harlander prefers to get her information straight from the horse’s mouth. Or, in this case, directly from the poultry she’s studying.
Ontario's Minister of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, Ernie Hardeman, recently launched a public awareness campaign to highlight mental health challenges suffered by farmers and encourage people to ask for help when daily struggles become too much to bear.
DATE: December 21LOCATION: CanadaDETAILS: As of December 21st, 22 confirmed cases of Salmonella have appeared in Canada. This prompted the Public Health Agency of Canada to collaborate with provincial public health partners, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and Health Canada to investigate the outbreak. The investigation found exposure to raw chicken and turkey products to be the likely source of the outbreak. That's because many individuals who got sick noted eating different types of chicken and turkey before their illness occurred. Almost half of the illnesses, which are genetically related to illnesses that date back to 2017, happened between October and November of 2018.SOURCE: Canada.ca
After a year of uncertainty, Canada, the U.S. and Mexico finally agreed on ‘NAFTA 2.0’. Renamed the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), all three countries are expected to ratify the deal fairly soon.
In late 2017, the Poultry Industry Council reported that, “increased numbers of reovirus-associated lameness cases were reported in Ontario broiler flocks by poultry veterinarians between August and October.” It was necessary for some infected birds to be euthanized.
DATE: December 16, 2018LOCATION: Saint- Felix-de-Valois in Lanaudiere Region of QuebecDETAILS: There have been no additional cases of Infectious Laryngotracheitis (ILT) reported from the Quebec outbreak. An aggressive vaccination program continues. The first confirmed case in this outbreak occurred on June 14, 2018.SOURCE: www.fbcc.ca
DATE: December 14, 2018LOCATION: Leeds Grenville, OntarioDETAILS: A small flock of seven layer type birds has tested positive for Infectious Laryngotracheitis (ILT). Clinical signs first appeared in late November. The virus has been identified as a wild strain. Poultry producers, small flock growers and service providers are being urged to maintain enhanced biosecurity.SOURCE: www.fbcc.ca
DATE: December 5, 2018LOCATION: Perth County, OntarioDETAILS: Further laboratory tests have confirmed the diagnosis of Infectious Laryngotracheitis (ILT) in a Perth county egg layer flock. Birds were previously vaccinated as pullets. Mortality levels are decreasing, and the remainder of the flock appears healthy. Strict biocontainment measures are in place at the farm. Poultry producers and small flock growers are being urged to maintain enhanced biosecurity, particularly in unvaccinated flocks in the 10 km radius biosecurity risk area.SOURCE: www.fbcc.ca
Magnum Trailer & Equipment Inc, a manufacturer and service provider for heavy duty trucks and trailers, has completed delivery of 35 new poultry trailers to Ontario-based Maple Lodge Farms.“These trailers are designed to improve the internal environment for the birds, by moderating the temperature, improving on-off loading and using smooth steel surfaces that are quick to clean for improved biosecurity,” said Mel Wubs, VP trailers and engineering for Magnum Trailer. The entire fleet was designed, manufactured and delivered within one year.Multi zone, full height, electric sliding vent panels optimize air flow and control interior temperature changes due to fluctuations in exterior climate, as well as the build-up of heat and humidity from the birds.The vent panels are computer controlled with a secondary manual control panel for direct operator control. The 53-foot trailers have Strenx 100XF steel deck surfaces for high durability and light weight that reduce spray down times and have rounded corners that are resistant to residue build-up. The Magnum clear-span hydraulic raising roof, combined with electric roll up curtains improves loading times and simplifies module securement.“Magnum’s engineering team worked with us to design features that would improve poultry welfare, which is really important to us," said Fred Marques, COO of Maple Lodge Farms."We were impressed with their material choices and manufacturing process to deliver a quality trailer that is expected to significantly increase the life expectancy over our previous fleet.”
Just two years ago, blockchain was a relatively unknown concept. Today, however, it is being called the biggest technological innovation of the decade and most influential corporate game-changer across industries.
The latest advances with an innovative new system for maximizing livestock feeding results have been unveiled by Canadian Bio-Systems Inc. (CBS Inc.) at the International Production & Processing Expo IPPE), Feb. 12-14, 2019 in Atlanta.“What’s your FSP fingerprint?” is a new approach to advanced precision livestock feeding that helps individual operations identify how they can best integrate and capture synergies among different types of feed science technology platforms.An early beta version of this robust science- and data-driven system was introduced last year coinciding with the launch of new CBS Inc. Feed Science Platforms (FSP). The full official launch of What’s your FSP fingerprint? at IPPE 2019 features the inclusion of further enhanced diagnostic technology and the introduction of a simple-to-use web-based application. (IPPE attendees can view the app and learn more by visiting CBS Inc. at Hall A, Booth A956.)“IPPE provides a window on many of the big picture trends and demands that are rapidly shaping the future of livestock production,” says Rob Patterson, CBS Inc. Technical Director. “These factors have major implications for the profitability and sustainability of all types of operations and for the sector as a whole. At the same time, advances in feed technology are opening new doors to help operations not only transition but thrive in this new environment.New opportunities in precision feeding“What’s your FSP fingerprint? allows everyone from nutritionists and producers to others involved in the feed industry and animal agriculture to quickly and simply identify the best package for success,” he says. “It takes the potential for precision feeding to a whole new level.”Every operation is unique and has its own requirements in order to truly maximize results in alignment with the latest expectations and opportunities, says Mark Peters, CBS Inc. Sales and Marketing Director. “Today the ability of an operation to keep up with the full spectrum of science-based feed technology innovation is a critical factor, not only in efficiency and overall production competitiveness but also in meeting specific, increasingly specialized market opportunities.“What’s your FSP fingerprint? provides a highly effective one-stop solution that fits today’s needs. It gives every operator peace of mind that they are utilizing the best package possible, customized to their specific requirements and objectives.”Capturing synergies across platformsThe FSPs include five areas of feed technology innovation: Multi-Carbohydrase technology, enhanced yeast technology, grain management technology, functional fatty acids, and phytogenics and probiotics. Together they represent a comprehensive portfolio of advanced bio-based feed technology solutions to benefit poultry, swine, aquaculture and ruminant production.What’s your FSP fingerprint? identifies the best customized package for each operation, leveraging a wealth of ongoing data collection along with more than 30 years of CBS Inc. research and development knowledge in partnership with leading university and institutional research programs.Dynamic science-driven potentialEach FSP area offers unique approaches to feed enhancement. Multi-Carbohydrase technology is a leading-edge area of enzyme technology pioneered by CBS Inc. that involves utilizing multiple enzymes with multiple activities to achieve a high level of targeted feed breakdown and nutrition capture.Enhanced yeast technology features natural growth promoter activity supporting healthy animals and optimized productivity. Functional fatty acids are gaining rising attention today, in particular for their potential to replace conventional options and support systems moving toward reduced use of antimicrobials.Grain management technology focuses on safeguarding feed quality to provide a valuable quality assurance tool and insurance policy for both feed and animals. Phytogenics and probiotics represent innovative plant-based extract technology that helps support a positive and nurturing environment critical to get the most efficiency and benefits from feed and nutrition approaches.
In the past decade, robotic solutions have found a home in the agricultural sector. Their uptake shouldn’t surprise anyone; robots are perfect for those repetitive and time-consuming tasks producers would prefer to leave behind.
The study of poultry production has progressed significantly over the past several years, including the introduction of more complex research approaches to understand changes in the bird.
The poultry industry has seen quick changes in regards to the usage of antibiotics. These have resulted in rapid responses by production teams to manage their processes differently. For instance, it would have been taboo five years ago to “wet” an egg in any way for fear of bacterial growth.
The goal of any broiler breeder program is to produce the greatest number of hatching eggs per hen housed and life of flock hatch to give us the most chicks per hen housed.
Transitioning from a conventional cage to alternative housing, either cage-free or within an aviary system, requires careful attention to good management. One important aspect of that is nutrition.
As you bundle up for winter, your livestock aren’t the only ones who want to stay out of the cold. Pests also seek shelter indoors when the temperatures drop. So, make the necessary preparations around your property to keep both the cold air and pests outside where they belong.
With the elimination of antibiotics occurring across Canadian poultry production, factors such as water quality are becoming much more important in the quest to optimize bird health.
There are three design elements of the Weeden sprinkler system.
Though barn fires are a year-round concern, most barn fires occur in the winter. The colder months are generally the time when feed and bedding storage is greatest, electricity use is high, and equipment repairs and upgrades are made. It is an important time to be extra vigilant. When it comes to barn fires, prevention is key.The Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA), in collaboration with representatives from fire protection and response, insurance, university, farm and commodity organizations, recommends these top 10 safety practices to reduce the risk of fire. These practices can be done without having to make major changes to building structures or equipment.1. Focus on HousekeepingMaintaining a clean and organized barn is a simple and cost-effective way to reduce the likelihood of barn fires.2. Limit The Use of Temporary Electrical EquipmentExtended use of temporary equipment can increase the chance of a fire occurring through degraded outlets and extension cords. Make sure to hard-wire electrical equipment that is used regularly.3. Regularly Inspect and Maintain Permanent Electrical SystemsThe humidity and corrosive gases generated by livestock and the storage of manure can degrade permanent electrical systems. The Electrical Safety Code has specific requirements for the installation of electrical equipment within livestock housing areas. For more information, see Section 22-204 and Bulletin 22-3-5 in the Ontario Electrical Safety Code and the OMAFRA factsheet, Electrical Systems in Barns.4. Perform Hot Works SafelyWhen using such things as welders and blow torches make sure to do the work in well-ventilated areas outside buildings. If the work needs to be done inside farm buildings, ensure the area is well ventilated, remove all combustible materials, place non-combustible pads under the work area, and have a fire extinguisher readily accessible.5. Participate in a Risk Reduction Assessment with Insurance or Fire DepartmentsMany insurance companies and fire departments offer onsite reviews or risk reduction assessments for farms. Take advantage of these opportunities to help identify potential risks and get recommendations to address concerns.6. Prepare and Implement a Fire Safety PlanA fire safety plan can help ensure a farm operation is regularly maintaining safety equipment, avoiding or reducing high risk activities and is prepared to respond to a fire.7. Regularly Inspect and Maintain Fire Walls, Fire Separations and Attic Fire StopsFire walls, fire separations and attic fire stops can slow down the progression of a fire within a building and increase the time for people to escape.8. Regularly Maintain HeatersEnsure heaters are properly installed, regularly maintained, and suspended well above combustibles or where they cannot be damaged by livestock.9. Store and Maintain Motorized Equipment Away From LivestockMotorized equipment, such as tractors, produce significant amounts of heat, even after being turned off and stored. This heat can dry debris caught in the equipment and cause the material to ignite. In addition, motorized equipment can develop electrical/mechanical failures that provide additional sources of ignition.10. Store Combustibles in a Designated Location Away From LivestockCombustibles such as straw or oil provide the fuel to feed a fire. Isolating these materials in a separate area reduces the risk of a fire spreading throughout the barn.Visit Ontario.ca/preventfarmfires for more details on the top 10 ways to reduce the risk of barn fires or find out about the other resources provided by OMAFRA, including new videos on how to reduce the risk.
The Agri-business Division of La Coop fédérée, a leader in the farm inputs business in Canada, announces that today it will start operating under the brand Sollio Agriculture.
Masterfeeds, an Alltech company, is pleased to announce the appointment of Mark Bodenham to the position of general manager for Ontario. They also thank and congratulate Peter Peacock on his retirement from the role, effective March 22, 2019.Bodenham joined Masterfeeds in 2013 after 26 successful years in monogastric sales and sales management. He has been instrumental in building and strengthening the Masterfeeds swine sales team in Ontario, as well as driving the development and introduction of the Vigor swine feeding programs. He is a graduate of the University of Guelph, where he received an associate diploma in agriculture and a bachelor’s degree in agriculture business.Peacock joined Masterfeeds in 2012 and assumed the general manager role for Ontario in 2013. He is retiring after a long and successful career in the Canadian feed industry.“With many years of feed industry experience in Ontario, Mark is well-equipped to assume this senior leadership role in our company,” said Rob Flack, president and CEO of Masterfeeds. “I thank Peter for his time and his dedication to growing our business and developing talent within our sales and management team, and I wish him the best in retirement.”
Chicken Farmers of Ontario (CFO) is pleased to announce the first recipient of the Ontario Chicken Innovation Award, co-applicants Grand River Foods and Maple Lodge Farms, who are collaborating to produce frozen, smoked chicken products using a proprietary process that is the first-of-its-kind in North America.“Congratulations to Grand River Foods and Maple Lodge Farms on being the inaugural recipients,” said R. Douglas Cunningham, chair of the Independent Advisory Committee that oversees CFO’s Ontario Chicken Innovation and Growth Program and was responsible for assessing applicants. “Their commitment to innovation is sure to put new chicken products on the plates of Canadian consumers for years to come.”Created in 2018 by CFO, the program is the first-of-its-kind in the chicken industry. It is open to primary processors, further processors, retailers, foodservice and restaurant companies involved in the processing, marketing and sale of chicken products. Companies that are not primary processors must include a primary processor as part of their application. Innovations must use chicken grown and fully processed in Ontario.In assessing applicants, the Independent Advisory Committee considered four factors: historic sales, projected future sales, the quality of the idea and economic value. An additional supply of live birds is directed to the successful applicant’s primary processor to enable the innovation.“This new, inline cooking approach allows chicken to be infused with a blend of smoke from untreated hardwoods through the cooking process and quickly frozen to lock in the flavours,” said Don Kilimnik, director of co-packing sales and special projects, Grand River Foods. “We’re thrilled to be able to further grow this product line with the additional supply of chicken.”“Our companies collaborate on many products and we are excited to be recognized,” added Fred Marques, chief operating officer, Maple Lodge Farms. “Chicken is already Canada’s favourite protein and we are confident that introducing new products like this will strengthen that position.”With the first year of the Ontario Chicken Innovation and Growth Program complete, the Independent Advisory Committee is reviewing the program and will open the next round of applications in the coming months.“We look forward to continuing to accelerate innovation in our industry and encourage all those involved in the processing, marketing and sale of chicken to consider applying,” said Ed Benjamins, chair of CFO.“By rewarding innovation, we can do more to put innovative chicken products on the plates of Canadian consumers and enhance economic activity in Ontario,” added Rob Dougans, CFO's president and CEO. “We look forward to seeing more successful applicants in the future.”For more information about the Program, visit www.chickeninnovation.ca.
Canadian student Midian Nascimento Dos Santos has been named as the first recipient of the Aviagen Poultry Genetics Scholarship. The scholarship is part of Aviagen’s contribution to the Canadian Poultry Research Council (CPRC). Aviagen has supported the CPRC since 2012, and now for the first time a portion of the company’s $25,000 (U.S. dollar) donation has been earmarked for the scholarship.Dos Santos is a 2014 graduate of the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, with a Bachelor of Science in Animal Science, and in 2017 she earned her Master’s in Poultry Science at Mississippi State University. She will apply the $5,000 scholarship award toward expenses for her current doctoral study in Poultry Behavior and Welfare at the University of Guelph in Canada.A panel of Aviagen geneticists selected Dos Santos from multiple applicants due to the importance of her graduate research to the poultry sector. During her current doctoral project, she has been evaluating and comparing the health of different genotypes of broiler chickens. Her goal is to improve the welfare of birds, while furthering the sustainability of poultry production.She explains that she intends for her study results to lead to scientific-based recommendations on better genetic selection and management strategies in broiler production. “I’m very honored and grateful to be the recipient of the Aviagen/CPRC post-graduate scholarship. The opportunity and financial support provided through this scholarship inspires me to pursue my career as a poultry researcher, in order to provide the industry with valuable information to promote animal welfare, health and sustainability.”“Aviagen is committed to the education of future poultry industry professionals. Poultry offers a host of exciting career opportunities, and we hope to encourage and support students whose creativity and talent will someday greatly benefit the industry,” commented Scott Gillingham, Canadian regional business consultant for Aviagen. “Midian was chosen from a very strong group of applicants. However, her research and goals closely align with those of Aviagen, namely, to help feed the world’s growing population with a nutritious and sustainable source of protein through continuous improvements in the breeding program, while continually advancing bird health and welfare. We wish her every success in her studies and future endeavors.”
Following the success of A&W's Beyond Meat Burger, the company is partnering with Beyond Meat to introduce a new breakfast option.The company is adding the Beyond Meat Sausage & Egger, which is made with Beyond Meat's 100% plant-based breakfast sausage, to its permanent breakfast menu on March 11th. A&W Food Services of Canada, Inc. will be the first restaurant chain to bring Beyond Meat's newest creation to Canadians from coast to coast."We recognize Canadians are increasingly interested in including more plant-based proteins in their diets," says Susan Senecal, A&W Canada's president and CEO. "Adding a plant-based protein option to our breakfast menu is the kind of innovation that we love. The classic recipe features Beyond Meat's breakfast sausage patty served with an egg and a slice of real cheddar cheese on a burger bun or an English muffin. For those seeking a plant-based breakfast sandwich, A&W is offering the Beyond Meat Sausage & Veggie. That option is with Beyond Meat's plant-based breakfast sausage patty and served with lettuce and tomato."We couldn't be happier to be expanding our partnership with A&W," said Beyond Meat Founder and CEO, Ethan Brown. "The consumer response to the Beyond Meat Burger at A&W has been overwhelmingly positive, and we know fans will be excited to start their day with our new Beyond Breakfast Sausage."We applaud A&W's forward-thinking approach and look forward to introducing Beyond Meat's latest product innovation to Canadians nationwide."
Employees of Sofina Foods Inc. have surpassed their goal to raise $1 million in support of children's charities across the country. The money was collected through an employee fundraising campaign known as Dream Builders, spearheaded by the Sofina Foundation, which celebrated its 5th anniversary in 2018."Since it was launched, the Dream Builders' Campaign has raised $1,134,640.00," said Michael Latifi, Founder, Chairman and CEO, Sofina Foods Inc. "We could not be prouder of this achievement. It is a clear indication that our employees embrace Sofina's values of giving, willingly investing their time and money to help us support worthy causes."Throughout the year, employees organize various internal events such as silent auctions, bake sales or various themed events. The 2018 campaign was the most successful to date with over $165,000 raised nationally across our sites. Sofina Foods Inc. then generously matched every dollar raised for a grand total of $330,000."The impact of the campaign has been tremendous. Over the course of five years, the funds raised have granted 40 children's wishes, sent 240 medically fragile children to Disney and helped our charity partners raise over $2.5 million by directly sponsoring events and fundraising initiatives," added Umeeda Madhany, Vice-President, The Sofina Foundation.The charities who will receive funding from the 2018 Dream Builders' Campaign are: Camp Oochigeas (Ooch) Canuck Place Children's Hospice The Children's Wish Foundation of Canada The London Children's Hospital Make-A-Wish Northern Alberta March Of Dimes Canada The MLSE Foundation The Montreal Children's Hospital Foundation The Ronald McDonald House Charities Toronto The Sunshine Foundation of Canada
Maple Leaf Foods Inc. called 2018 a challenging year with essentially flat sales, but one that sets it up for a successful future as it touted itself as a leader in plant-protein products.Global trading relationships created unprecedented volatility that reverberated across the pork industry, said Michael McCain during a conference call with analysts Thursday after the company released its fourth-quarter financial report.The company still delivered essentially flat sales for the year in this turbulent environment, he said.''With all the short-termism of the markets aside, we feel 2018 was, in fact, an important year,'' McCain said.He outlined the company's accomplishments including growing its raised-without-antibiotics meat portfolio, completing several strategic acquisitions and announcing the construction of a new poultry facility.That investment drove a $42.2-million restructuring charge in the fourth quarter, a one-time expense that contributed to Maple Leaf's drop in profit compared with a year ago.However, McCain honed in most on advancing the company's plant-based protein offerings. The company launched Greenleaf Foods SPC in October, a subsidiary headquartered in Chicago that will add to Maple Leaf's plant-based food offerings.In January, the company launched a new pea-protein Lightlife burger, first with American food service companies. U.S. grocery stores will start to stock the product in late March, while the Canadian launch won't take place until April.''We are really, really jazzed up about this,'' said McCain, saying the company seized on the rising demand of alternative proteins that look and taste like meat.The Beyond Meat burger, a rival plant-based offering that attempts to mimic the taste and texture of meat, is already available in Canada in a number of restaurants, including fast-food chain A&W.When Maple Leaf acquired Lightlife Foods and Field Roast Grain Meat Co. in 2017 and 2018 respectively, the category was growing between 10 and 13 per cent, McCain said.It's now growing more than 30 per cent, he said, and the company's growth rates are in line with that.''We're the leading operator in North America and we're going to continue to invest in it and ride that wave aggressively,'' he said.Maple Leaf reported a profit of $11.9 million or 10 cents per diluted share for the quarter ended Dec. 31. That is down nearly 80 per cent from a profit of $59.1 million or 45 cents per diluted share in the last three months of 2017.Sales totalled $893.9 million, up from $876.8 million.Adjusted earnings per share for the quarter amounted to 29 cents per share, down from 41 cents per share in the fourth quarter of 2017. The average analyst estimate was a profit of 34 cents per share, according to Thomson Reuters Eikon.The company raised its quarterly dividend to 14.5 cents per share, up from its previous payment of 13 cents per share.
The Skinner family is spending Family Day planning a trip to Kenya. The Perth County pork producers are trying to start a poultry co-op in a village in the African nation, after starting a dairy co-op during their last visit.Why cattle and chicken, and not pigs? | READ MORE
Merck Animal Health (known as MSD Animal Health outside the United States and Canada) announced a collaboration agreement with Rapid Genomics which grants the company exclusive rights to Rapid Genomics’ vaccination verification tool, Viral Flex-Seq. This tool will be utilized in combination with Merck Animal Health’s Innovax range of vaccines, including Innovax-ND-IBD, a unique vaccine that provides long-term protection against three infectious poultry diseases, Newcastle Disease (ND), Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD) and Marek’s Disease (MD), in a single dose. The collaboration was announced at the 2019 International Production & Processing Expo (IPPE) being held in Atlanta, Georgia, from February 12-14, 2019.“This partnership will bring together Merck Animal Health’s unique broad vaccine product line and Rapid Genomics’ innovative vaccination verification test, to optimize and enhance disease outbreak management in poultry for improved animal health and welfare,” said Taylor Barbosa, DVM, Ph.D., ACPV, Executive Director, Global Poultry Marketing, MSD Animal Health. “As the poultry industry grows, there is an increased need for improving disease control to optimize productivity and we are committed to growing with the industry to bring innovative solutions to our customers.”Viral Flex-Seq is a product that provides a highly sensitive and accurate result to confirm the presence of the vaccine replication in the bird. Viral Flex-Seq uses next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, an advanced method of genomic analysis, to specifically detect replication of Innovax vaccines and differentiate them from field viruses.“We are proud and excited to partner with Merck Animal Health, an industry-leading poultry vaccine company,” said Richard Currie, BVM&S, Ph.D., CEO, Rapid Genomics. “This partnership supports our mission as innovators in the field of genomic testing to set the standard for HVT vector vaccine detection and associated infectious pathogen diagnosis.”
Tommy Bagwell, former chairman & CEO of American Proteins, was honored by U.S. Poultry & Egg Association during the 2019 International Production & Processing Expo, where he received the Harold E. Ford Lifetime Achievement Award. This prestigious honor was presented to Bagwell by Tom Hensley, president of Fieldale Farms and outgoing USPOULTRY chairman.The Harold E. Ford Lifetime Achievement Award is presented to an individual whose dedication and leadership over the years have far exceeded the ordinary and impacted both the poultry industry and U.S. Poultry & Egg Association in an exemplary manner. The award is presented non-annually and when the Awards and Recognition Committee unanimously recognizes and endorses the need for occasional, unique recognition for exceptional contributions.“The connecting ties and friendship between Tommy, American Proteins and USPOULTRY are long and deep. In fact, it was Tommy’s father, Leland, who hired Harold Ford, for whom this award is named. It is a privilege to work with Tommy, and we are honored to present this award,” remarked John Starkey, president of USPOULTRYA native of North Georgia, Bagwell earned a degree in economics from Clemson University with a minor in Spanish. He also completed graduate studies in industrial management, business administration and economics at Clemson and the University of Georgia.In 1969, Bagwell began his professional career at North Georgia Rendering Co, now known as American Proteins, Inc. In 1972, upon the death of his father Leland, Bagwell became president. Today, American Proteins services the poultry industry from plants in Georgia and Alabama and supplies feed ingredients throughout the world. American Proteins was sold to Tyson Foods last year.Bagwell has been an active member of the Republican Regents and Republican Governors Association for the past several years. He was appointed a member of the Governor’s Energy Policy Council. He has also served as election observer for the Carter Center in Venezuela and Peru.Bagwell is involved in numerous local organizations. He has been a board member of the NE Georgia Council of Boy Scouts, charter president of the Forsyth County Rotary Club, and served as a trustee of Kennesaw State University, Lanier Technical College and Brenau University. He also serves on the U.S. Poultry & Egg Harold E. Ford Foundation board of directors. In 2014, Bagwell received the Philanthropist of the Year Award from the North Georgia Community Foundation.
As a celebration of exceptional performance and dedication to poultry breeding, Cobb-Vantress recently presented its annual Flock Awards to North American poultry customers who demonstrated remarkable results in 2018.Launched in 2004, the awards program recognizes top-performing facilities in the United States, Canada, Mexico and Central America that are maximizing the genetic potential of Cobb breeding stock. Each year, the Cobb technical services team conducts an annual Sold Flock Breeder Survey to determine the award recipients based on egg production, hatchability, chicks per hen housed and life of flock hen mortality.Cobb representatives announced the winners in January and will host individual ceremonies to present winners with plaques to commemorate their achievements.“With the support of our dedicated technical service team, our customers continue to exceed the possibilities of Cobb breeder performance each year,” said Ken Semon, senior director of technical service for Cobb North America. “Their commitment to excellence is unparalleled, which is evident in the high level of performance these winners achieved last year. All of the winners should be proud of their accomplishments, and our top performers will continue to serve as motivation, driving the North American poultry breeding industry to newfound levels of success.”The full list of 2018 North American winners include: Award                  Cobb-Vantress Customer Location Country Co-National Best, Cobb500 George’s Inc. Harrisonburg, Va. United States Co-National Best, Cobb500 Pilgrim’s Harrisonburg, Va. United States Co-National Best, Cobb700 Tyson Foods, Inc. Noel, Mo. United States Co-National Best, Cobb700 Tyson Foods, Inc. Oglethorpe, Ga. United States Cobb500 Fast Feather Top Flock Producer Pilgrim’s Moorefield, W.Va. United States Cobb500 Slow Feather Top Flock Producer Pitman Family Farms Sanger, Calif. United States Cobb700 Top Flock Producer Peco Foods, Inc. Sebastopol, Miss. United States Cobb500 Package Top Flock Producer Tyson Foods, Inc. Snead, Ala. United States National Best Synergy Agri Group Inc. Port Williams, Nova Scotia Canada Cobb500 Fast Feather Synergy Agri Group Inc. Port Williams, Nova Scotia Canada Cobb500 Slow Feather Cooperative Fédérée De Quebec Victoriaville, Quebec Canada Total Eggs Per Hen Hatched (Mx x 500F) Synergy Agri Group Inc. Port Williams, Nova Scotia Canada Regional Best, Cobb500 CMI-IP – Avicola Villalobos Guatemala City Guatemala Cobb500 Fast Feather CMI-IP – Avicola Pollo Rey San Jose Costa Rica Cobb500 Slow Feather CMI-IP – Avicola Villalobos Guatemala City Guatemala Mexico Best, Cobb500 Buenaventura Villaflores, Chiapas Mexico  “It is a great privilege to be receive the Best Cobb Package award,” said David Pruitt, breeder hatchery manager at the Tyson Foods, Inc. facility in Snead, Alabama, and winner of the Cobb500 Package Top Flock Producer award. “It was a team effort – and one that would not have been possible without the family of one of our dedicated growers coming together after losing their father midway through the flock.”
Cobb-Vantress announced today the release of new management guides and product supplements as part of the company’s enhancements to its Cobb Academy program. These resources were updated to reflect top-performing flocks, and provide best practices and recommendations to help maximize genetic potential.The refreshed guides and supplements are presented in a color-coded format to ensure that customers and distributors are able to easily find the information they need. All materials were crafted by Cobb’s world technical support and regional technical teams. This highly specialized international group covers a range of disciplines including hatchery, breeder and broiler management; microbiology; veterinary medicine; nutrition; environmental control; and processing.“We’re committed to the success of our customers, taking every action we can to help them succeed and maximize the genetic potential of their flocks — and ultimately their bottom line,” said Robin Jarquin, director of world technical support at Cobb-Vantress. “We know our guides and supplements are an important resource and a popular feature with our customers, so we hope they enjoy the updated materials complete with current data and newly available best practices compiled by our team of experts. We are committing to updating these materials more frequently to ensure our customers always have the best information for their operations.”Cobb’s team updated nine pieces in total, including: Broiler Management Guide Cobb500 supplements: Cobb500 Slow Feather Breeder Management Supplement Cobb500 Slow Feather Parent Laying/Rearing Chart (available in pounds and grams) Cobb500 Fast Feather Breeder Management Supplement Cobb500 Fast Feather Parent Laying/Rearing Chart (available in pounds and grams) Cobb500 Broiler Performance and Nutrition Supplement Cobb700 supplements: Cobb700 Breeder Management Supplement Cobb700 Parent Laying/Rearing Chart (available in pounds and grams) CobbMV Male Supplement Cobb updated these materials as part of its effort to enhance its Academy portal (available at www.cobb-vantress.com/academy), an extensive database of knowledge collected from Cobb experts across the globe. In addition to management guides and supplements, Cobb Academy also features a library of articles highlighting the latest technical information and industry best practices, as well as a series of videos sharing information directly from the company’s experts.All updated materials are available now in the Academy section of Cobb’s website and on the Cobb Connection mobile app, and will be available in print at Cobb’s booth at the International Production & Processing Expo in Atlanta February 12-14, 2019.Resources are currently available in English, with select pieces in Spanish. Soon, all resources will be available in the various languages Cobb supports.
The PeckStone has been sold in many countries around the world since 2013.
A group of Toronto scientists will soon attempt to develop a less-expensive way to grow lab-made meat after securing a grant from an American non-profit aiming to boost advances in cultured protein.Cellular agriculture has been touted as the future of food thanks to its smaller environmental footprint and consideration for animal welfare, but until recently much of the research has been done south of the border.Cultured food uses cell cultures to grow animal products like beef, eggs or milk in a laboratory without the need for livestock. Some companies have already made these kinds of products, but it's an expensive undertaking and no such items are readily available on store shelves yet.''This is our, my first foray into this kind of research,'' said Peter Stogios, a senior research associate at the University of Toronto and lead researcher on the winning project.He's trying to overcome what he sees as one of the biggest hurdles for the whole industry of cultured meat – an expensive component to what he likens to a broth needed to grow meat in a lab.The broth is composed of vitamins, minerals, amino acids and growth factors that are essential to sustain tissue culture. Those growth factors are very expensive, he said.''Can we create those protein molecules, those growth factors better, cheaper and actually make them more potent?'' he said.The four-person team will cast a wide net to look at growth factors from other species, like birds and fish, and attempt to mix those with cow cells. They hope to start the initial phase immediately and wrap it up within six months.If they discover an exotic growth factor or multiple that works really well, he said, the team will enter into an engineering phase where it will try to make them more potent. The second phase could take a year and a half.The Good Food Institute in Washington, D.C., awarded the team US$250,000 over two years to pursue the project in an announcement made earlier this month. It's one of 14 projects to receive the inaugural grant for plant-based and cell-based meat research and development, and the only cell-based project winner from Canada.The GFI was particularly excited with Stogios's proposal because it addresses the industry's cost issue and isn't just looking at lab-grown beef, but also possibilities for other proteins, like chicken, said Erin Rees Clayton, the scientific foundations liaison.Whatever advances Stogios and his team make will be published and widely available, hopefully eliminating repetitive research and development at cell-based meat companies, she said.''If Peter is able to create these, they'll be relevant to many different companies and they won't have to spend the time and resources to create those growth factors,'' she said.Neither she nor Stogios are aware of any other academic research in a similar vein, though it's possible a company in the industry is privately conducting similar research.Stogios said the current research is in the early stages, but depending on what he discovers, the third stage would be to enter into industrial agreements with companies to scale up.''I think it would be amazing,'' he said.Stogios, who admits he's new to the lab-grown meat field, isn't aware of much other research in the area being conducted in Canada.''We face this in everything in innovation in Canada,'' he said. ''Nobody has the answer to it.''He speculates there's a lack of venture capital funding to launch and then grow startups in Canada.New Harvest, a non-profit U.S. research organization that funds cellular agriculture research, was established in 2004 and was once headquartered in Toronto.''The relative lack of interest from consumers and researchers (and ultimately, donors) in Canada is one of the reasons why New Harvest moved its office from Toronto to New York City in 2015,'' said the organization's then communications director Erin Kim in an email in 2017.At the time, she said Canada was ''lagging well behind the U.S.,'' but considered it understandable due to the massive difference in the countries' population sizes. New Harvest declined to comment prior to publication on whether the situation has changed since.Some Canadian startups in this space have emerged. Vancouver-based Appleton Meats is working ''to engineer the perfect beef patty,'' according to its website, while Edmonton-based Future Fields is also working on cellular agriculture products.Rees Clayton said the innovation is no longer confined to the U.S. She's starting to see much more global interest in cellular agriculture.''Certainly we're seeing interest from Canadian researchers and entrepreneurs on both the plant-based side and cell-based meat side.''
If you relied on Canadian media and politicians alone, you might think topics like the economy and health care were what Canadians cared about most. You would be wrong. Canadians’ top priority is much more fundamental than that – before they can worry about hospital wait times or the cost to heat their homes this winter, they first and foremost need healthy, affordable food to eat and feed their families.
As the Canadian poultry industry continually improves bird welfare, it’s incorporating new research and technologies into transport and handling.
More than half the food produced in Canada is wasted and the average kitchen tosses out hundreds of dollars worth of edibles every year, says a study researchers are calling the first of its kind.
It’s long been standard industry practice to remove the tip of a bird’s beak in an effort to minimize the severity of cannibalism in poultry flocks. For at least the last decade, many Canadian hatcheries have primarily been using an infrared beak treatment. While research has been conducted on the impacts on adult hens, there has been little focus on how it affects young pullets.
How do you measure a chicken’s happiness? Is it in the way it runs for food? How much time it spends preening?To size up what might make chickens happy in their brief lives, researchers at the University of Guelph putting 16 breeds through physical fitness and behavioural tests. They’re watching how well birds scramble over a barrier for food, how skittish they seem and whether they play with a fake worm.Chickens can’t say how they feel, but playing with a fake worm may be a sign of happiness.For the full story, CLICK HERE.
Global animal health and nutrition company Alltech has launched a new poultry feed additive it says aids in optimizing gut form and function.Called Viligen, the company says it contains a range of new, scientifically-backed ingredients to support gastrointestinal tissue growth and activity.It blends fatty acids, prebiotics and essential trace elements, which Alltech’s researchers say combine to promote beneficial bacteria in the gut and support natural defenses.“This product supports growth, intestinal integrity and the bird’s own natural immune defenses,” said Dr. Kayla Price, Canadian poultry technical manager at Alltech.“We believe that this product may help poultry producers in Canada knowing that better intestinal health leads to improved performance.”Viligen is a part of the Alltech Gut Health Management program as well as the Alltech Antibiotic-Free and Alltech Antibiotic Reduction programs.
SELEGGT, a joint venture between HatchTech, German supermarket chain REWE and the University of Leipzig, has developed a market-ready method for gender identification in hatching eggs.In Germany, supermarkets are already selling eggs from 'hens without brothers'.The eggs from which the laying hens are born have been checked on the genus during the incubation process.In the SELEGGT method, a laser burns a hole of no more than 0.3 millimetres into the hatching egg shell.Afterwards, a small amount of fluid is extracted through a non-invasive procedure. Hence the interior of the hatching egg is untouched and remains safe and sound.Through a change in colour, a marker will indicate whether the sex-specific hormone estrone sulphate can be detected in the hatching egg.If detected, a female chick is developing in the hatching egg. Consequently, only female chicks hatch on the 21st day of the incubation.No estrone sulphate indicates a male hatching egg, which is separated and processed into high-quality animal feed.The developers expect the method will prevent millions of male day-old chicks from being gassed.In Germany alone, around 45 million male chicks from laying hen breeds are killed every year.German Federal Minister of Food and Agriculture Julia Klöckner welcomed the news. “This is a great day for animal welfare in Germany!”Jan Kunath, the Deputy Chief Executive Officer of REWE Group, adds, “Throughout next year, our customers will be able to buy the so called free-range respeggt-eggs gradually throughout Germany.”At the same time, SELEGGT is developing a business model to make the technology available to the industry as a cost-neutral service.The patented process will be available to the first hatcheries from 2020.Canadian researchers at McGill University, with support from Egg Farmers of Ontario, have been developing their own gender identification technology for several years.Called Hypereye, the patented scanning device is still being fine-tuned and recently received $844,000 in funding from the federal government to help get it to market.
The level of early chick mortality (ECM) is one of the crucial factors that determines the quality of chicken production and, hence, the economic return from a poultry production unit. Yolk sac infection (YSI) has been reported as the most frequent cause of ECM, and in recent years significant increase in ECM due to YSI has emerged as a threat to broiler operations in parts of Canada. 
Undercover video. Two words that will send shivers up the spine of anyone who works in agriculture and food. There have been well over 200 undercover videos in the U.S. and 16 in Canada since 2012 targeting agriculture from farms through to processing. While it’s human nature to hope one never focuses on you, your company, suppliers or customers – it’s always better to be prepared.
Research shows that under natural conditions, domestic fowl spend 70 per cent of their active time foraging by walking on the ground because their flight abilities are limited. When threatened or roosting, domestic hens seek elevated refuges. For roosting, birds fly up to the lowest branch of a tree and seek higher elevation by flying branch-to-branch, whereas they descend by flying directly to the ground. Hens use their wings only for brief escape flights.
Meat consumption in North America is changing. Product developers and policy-makers need to understand the reasons for that change. 
It’s hard for some to believe that the meal kit sector is booming. It’s strange to think that people would buy a kit with all the ingredients for a meal (or have it delivered) and cook it when they could just buy the ingredients themselves for a substantially lower price.
Small poultry flocks are growing in popularity in Ontario. Many small flock owners have launched into raising their own meat and eggs without any previous farming skills or husbandry knowledge in how to best look after the birds in their care.
NSF International, a global public health and safety organization known for food safety and quality, launched new Global Animal Wellness Standards to address the full lifecycle of all key species and establish best practices for how animals are kept, raised and responsibly managed. The standards are the first of their kind in establishing a universal approach to animal health and wellness.
Happy New Year! As you’ll read in the pages ahead, we’re ringing in 2019 with an eye towards the future. This issue is focused on the research and innovations that will help shape the industry in the coming years.
Most Canadians celebrate innovation when it comes to their phones, cars and medical breakthroughs. Break out the party horns!
The federal government says it plans to spend $1.75 billion by March without having said what the money is for, though at least some of the cash is likely to go to farmers hurt by new trade deals.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau isn't ruling out the possibility that Canada will ratify its new North American trade deal with the United States and Mexico even if U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminum exports are still in place.
Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, Lawrence MacAulay, announced this week a new working group comprised of poultry and egg farmers and processors.
Canadian Bio-Systems Inc. (CBS Inc.) has launched the main phase rollout of its new Feed Science Platforms, offering a comprehensive portfolio of advanced bio-based feed technology solutions to benefit swine, poultry, aquaculture and ruminant production.
At a time when the North American feed industry is undergoing a dramatic transformation driven by new rules, heightened market expectations and groundbreaking technology advances, a growing number of major farming operations are opting to take charge of their futures by embracing a stronger direct role in feed production and feed additive innovation.
Whole bird turkey sales in Canada have declined quite a bit over the last few years, especially during the last two. Still, the turkey sector in Canada and in the U.S. continues to find success building consumption of other products.

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